‘Stand up and fight’ to bring Limerick military history to life

first_imgLimerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live TAGSfeaturedFirst World WarGallipoliIrish Naval AssociationlimerickLimerick archivist Jacqui HayesLimerick Branch of the Royal British LegionRoyal Munster FusiliersStand Up and Fight Advertisement Twitter WhatsApp Email Facebook NewsLocal News‘Stand up and fight’ to bring Limerick military history to lifeBy Alan Jacques – April 30, 2015 1677 Vanishing Ireland podcast documenting interviews with people over 70’s, looking for volunteers to share their stories Printcenter_img Linkedin The Royal Munster Fusiliers drumming up recruits in Limerick in 1914.(Photograph by H M Stewart, 104 O’’Connell Street)by Alan [email protected] up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up The Royal Munster Fusiliers drumming up recruits in Limerick in 1914.(Photograph by H M Stewart, 104 O’’Connell Street)FLOWERS sent to a Limerick mother from her son on the front lines of the First World War and an oar from one of the Lusitania’s lifeboats are just two of the rare artefacts that will go on display at City Hall next week.‘Stand Up and Fight’, an exhibition supported by the Limerick Branch of the Royal British Legion, the Royal Munster Fusiliers Association and the Irish Naval Association, will be launched next Thursday, May 7.Never before seen artefacts will be displayed as part of the exhibition of Limerick’s military history from the Wild Geese to Gallipoli.It coincides with the centenary of the Gallipoli campaign that claimed the lives of 800 members of the Royal Munster Fusiliers, 75 of whom were from Limerick including eight men from the village of Coonagh who died when their ship was torpedoed.Conservative estimates suggest that 1,000 of Limerick’s 4,000 listed men died in the First World War.Items on display will include flowers sent from from Ypres by a Limerick soldier to his mother in Limerick; an oar from one of RMS Lusitania’s lifeboats as well as cannonballs and musket balls from the Siege of Limerick.Also included are pikes from the time of the 1798 Rebellion; a bloodied apron worn by a Limerick nurse serving in a First World War field hospital and rare photographs of the American Civil War, Boer War and First World War.“From the departure of the Wild Geese in 1691 to the Limerick men who fought in the Boer Wars, Limerick is steeped in military history,” explained city archivist Jacqui Hayes.“Limerick’s location on the Shannon means it has always been a strategic military stronghold. There were four barracks in Limerick in the nineteenth century and soldiers were a familiar sight.”The ‘Stand Up and Fight’ exhibition will feature memorabilia and militaria from Limerick Museum and Archives’ own collection as well as donations by private collectors and members of the public.Also featured are American Civil War army uniform buttons produced by the Limerick-based Tait Clothing Factory, which held military uniform supply contracts with the Confederacy as well as the British Army during the Crimean War.While much of the exhibition is concerned with the participation of Limerick men and women in The Great War, it also deals with Limerick’s long military and naval tradition as well as the military culture that started in earnest in the 17th century and has lasted since.“While primarily focusing on Limerick’s lengthy military history, the exhibition also examines the impact of the military on Limerick’s social history in these centuries, such as the numbers who joined the armed forces; particular areas which had a tradition of recruitment; family military traditions and the role of women,” Ms Hayes commented.The exhibition looks at some of the careers of Limerick men who fought in the British army all over the world. One of them, George de Lacy Evans from Moig, Askeaton, was involved in the burning of the White House by the British in 1814. He also made a major contribution to army reform by successfully campaigning for an end to flogging in the British army.‘Stand Up and Fight’ runs from May 7 until December at the Glazed Street, Limerick City and County Council Civic Buildings, Merchants Quay. Previous articleAAA join the fight for ‘full equality’ in LimerickNext articleAfghan ‘golden boy’ claims crash ruined his life Alan Jacqueshttp://www.limerickpost.ie RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed livelast_img read more

Bill Clinton speaks at UCLA rally for Jerry Brown and Gavin Newsom

first_imgDespite the clouds covering the city Friday evening, it was a star-studded night in Los Angeles for the Democratic Party.California gubernatorial candidate Jerry Brown spoke at UCLA with just a few weeks to go before the Nov. 2 election, bringing with him some of the state’s and nation’s most prominent Democrats: Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, San Francisco Mayor and candidate for state lieutenant governor Gavin Newsom and former President Bill Clinton.In good company – Flanked by Democratic gubernatorial candidate Jerry Brown (left) and San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom, former President Bill Clinton addressed a crowd of thousands at UCLA Friday night. – Photo courtesy of the Daily BruinThe rally was one of many stops high-profile Democrats have made across the country in recent weeks in an attempt to drum up support for the party.“Are we going to take back California?” Villaraigosa yelled to an already-screaming crowd as the other Democrats took the stage shortly after 8 p.m.The three spent about an hour speaking to thousands of listeners gathered in UCLA’s Dickson Court, trading compliments and slamming their opponents in an effort to rally a higher youth turnout on Nov. 2.“It is not enough to have voted for a new president if you will not help him govern and stick behind the members of Congress who stood for him,” Clinton said. “What you must do is pick leaders who know how to be both frugal and in the future business. You’ve got to put California back in the future business.”The future was a common theme throughout the evening, as all three men spoke to interests particular to a college-aged audience: the environment, the economy and education.A product of the University of California system himself, Brown emphasized the need for public higher education to be available to all students, regardless of their backgrounds.“[We need to] get every kid in this school that can qualify,” Brown said. “Everyone. Whether they’re documented or not.”Clinton emphasized the importance of green technologies in revitalizing California’s economy, saying both Brown and Newsom would continue their support of such technologies, unlike their opponents.Clinton alluded to Republican gubernatorial candidate Meg Whitman and her proposal to suspend AB 32  — a law aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions —  until the state unemployment rate drops.“You stick with this greenhouse gas commitment you got; don’t you repeal that,” Clinton said. “It is the key to your economic future.”The best place for California’s future, Newsom and Clinton said, is in Brown’s hands.“We are lucky in this state,” Newsom said. “Jerry Brown has nothing to prove to anybody. He was twice governor of our great state, he has held every key office, he has accomplished more than folks like me could every dream of. But he’s willing to take the years where he could be writing a memoir and instead, he’s going to be writing the future of our great state.”“One thing you can count on: I’m not writing any damn memoir,” Brown said, to laughter and cheers from the crowd.Brown has been a political opponent to both Newsom and Clinton during his years as a politician; he opposed Clinton in the 1992 presidential primary and ran against Newsom in the Democratic primary for governor — during which Clinton endorsed Newsom.Their past differences were put aside on Friday, however, as the three sought to get a bigger message across to the audience: Young voters need to show up on Nov. 2.“I’ve lived my life. It’s been great. I just want you to have the same chances I did,” Clinton said. “I am pleading with you; you need to go out and tell everyone who is not here tonight that any college student in the state of California that doesn’t vote in this election is committing malpractice on your own future.”Clinton’s appearance at UCLA — along with President Barack Obama’s upcoming visit to USC on Friday — sends a strong message to student voters, said Aaron Perman, a senior majoring in business administration who is the vice president of USC College Democrats.“The college demographic is a lot of what drove Obama to win and was the backbone of the volunteer effort,” said Perman, who attended the rally at UCLA. “I think it’s recognizing that and recognizing that students still have a lot of things to care about. It shows students, ‘Hey, you really can make a difference.’”Michael Maulano, a junior majoring in political science and finance director of the College Democrats who also attended Friday’s event, agreed.“It’s an extremely important election for youth,” he said. “The problems facing the country and the issues we face today are certainly not going to wait. They’re going to affect us for a long time.”Excerpts from the Rally:Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa: San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom: Gubernatorial Candidate Jerry Brown: President Bill Clinton (Part 1): President Bill Clinton (Part 2):last_img read more

Despite low positive test numbers in region, Cerro Gordo County public health director doesn’t want people to get complacent

first_imgMASON CITY — Despite the north-central region of the state having the lowest level of any of the six regions on the state’s COVID-19 assessment scale, Cerro Gordo County Department of Public Health director Brian Hanft says residents should not get complacent about taking precautions to prevent the spread of coronavirus.He says,  “I think our numbers are low because we haven’t been complacent. I believe it’s because our population has adhered to following the guidelines, and because of that we’ve been successful. I don’t want people to feel like it’s now time to relax again. This is an all-day, everyday effort, and it’s going to remain as an ongoing effort for the near future, and by that I’m meaning many months to come.”Hanft says a number of things can be pinpointed to why there’s only been one lab-confirmed case of COVID-19 in Cerro Gordo County reported in the last ten days.  “The public’s adherence to social distancing guidelines by remaining at home as much as possible. Business closures, as economically painful as they are,   and it’s always difficult for me to even say that because I understand the impact, but I believe that they have had a substantial help in controlling the spread. School closures. which goes back a few weeks, but without a doubt have been a major move to control the spread. And then public messaging and the promotion of flattening the curve  I believe has been effective.”Hanft says with more testing taking place through Governor Reynolds’ “Test Iowa” initiative, the public should anticipate the number of positive cases to rise.  “That’s been kind of our point all along from the get-go. When we first announced cases, even in the United States, testing availability has been a struggle, and that’s certainly been the case here in Iowa. As we conduct additional cases, we’re likely to find those people who are asymptomatic, which is part of the problem with this virus, is that people can walk around asymptomatically and not know that they’re spreading the virus. As we ramp up our testing initiatives and our efforts with the availability of those tests, we will see additional cases.”As of this morning, the north-central based Region 2 was at a four on the regional assessment scale. Northeast Iowa, where further restrictions were put in place late last week by Governor Reynolds, is still at the scale’s worst level of 10. The southeast and south-central regions of Iowa are at a nine. Southwestern Iowa is at six, while northwest Iowa is at five.last_img read more