Pasadena’s Assemblymember Introduces Legislation to Create State School Nurse Consultant at California Department of Education

first_img Top of the News 31 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Business News Community News Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPasadena Public WorksPasadena Water and PowerPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Make a comment Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy center_img Subscribe Community News More Cool Stuff First Heatwave Expected Next Week Assemblymember Chris HoldenOn Thursday, Assemblymember Chris Holden introduced AB 285, legislation that creates a State School Nurse Consultant within the Department of Education to oversee school nurses and supervisors of health and to advise the State Superintendent on student health issues.“How, when, and where to open schools takes a lot of expertise, communication, and coordination between different agencies at different levels of government,” said Assemblymember Chris Holden. “A State School Nurse Position will help keep our children healthy and safe beyond the current pandemic.”A school nurse at the Department of Education will lend strong insight into how schools operate safely during this pandemic. Outside of infectious disease events like the current Pandemic, there are additional public health issues that impact schools that would benefit from this new position. Health issues like mental health, diabetes, nutrition, vision, physical activity, safety are all issues that schools are trying to address. A School Nurse Consultant will provide guidance and insight to schools so our students can thrive in and outside of the classroom.Currently, there is no school nurse to address health issues in the Department of Education. New laws and mandates are placed on schools to address health issues like administering medications, vision tests, and EpiPens, but there is no position at the California Department of Education to advise school districts on the implementation of those laws. AB 285 aims to enhance a public health perspective at the Department of Education, which will better-serve California students.“AB 285 is a solution we always needed, but is now more urgent than ever in the face of the COVID-19 Pandemic,” continued Holden. Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * HerbeautyWant To Seriously Cut On Sugar? You Need To Know A Few TricksHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyYou Can’t Go Past Our Healthy Quick RecipesHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty7 Most Startling Movie Moments We Didn’t Realize Were InsensitiveHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyInstall These Measures To Keep Your Household Safe From Covid19HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty9 Things You’ve Always Wanted To Know About RihannaHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Lies You Should Stop Telling Yourself Right NowHerbeautyHerbeauty Government Pasadena’s Assemblymember Introduces Legislation to Create State School Nurse Consultant at California Department of Education Published on Thursday, January 21, 2021 | 4:45 pmlast_img read more

Well water safety

first_imgBy April SorrowUniversity of GeorgiaWhen Frank Hancock was called to the house of a mother with two children sickened by E. coli bacteria, he discovered that the water from their well was the source. He found other wells in the county with problems, too. “I don’t think our experience is different than any other county,” said Hancock, a University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agent in Henry County. “People are not maintaining their wells. They don’t think about where their water is coming from.”Most people don’t know that they must maintain their wells, he said. “If the county water supply has a problem, there are probably 100 people working on it,” he said. “If your well has a problem and you aren’t working on it, no one is.” To get the word out in his county, Hancock organized a well water maintenance seminar.“We wanted to let people know the risks of not taking care of their well,” he said, “and tell them, ‘this is your responsibility.’” “You will find low levels of bacteria in most wells,” said Parshall Bush, a residue chemist with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. “There are different levels of contamination.”Since 2003, 10 percent of bored wells tested at the UGA Agricultural and Environmental Services Laboratory contain E. coli. More than half failed to meet Environmental Protection Agency municipal drinking water standards. One out of three showed bacteria levels high enough to cause illness. Most water samples sent to the lab come from north Georgia.Drilled wells, typically deeper than 100 feet, are less likely to be contaminated by bacteria. Wells less than 60 feet deep are more likely than deeper wells to be contaminated. Soil above the water table doesn’t filter enough bacteria from shallow groundwater. If a septic system is too close to the well or not working properly, Bush said, it can be the bacteria source.“Contamination can occur if the well was improperly constructed or if the well is located in a depression that collects surface runoff,” Bush said. The UGA well-cam was used to checkout problem wells in Henry County.“We saw cracks in well liners, tree roots so numerous in wells that the camera couldn’t pass by, wells with spider webs down to the 14-foot level,” Hancock said. “We also saw well houses totally contaminated with gas, pesticides, fertilizer and rats.” Nitrate, lead and copper are the primary contaminates found in Georgia well water, said Bush. “Nitrate contamination is the result of fertilizer application or animal operations and copper and lead can be attributed to corrosive pipes.” All pesticides and herbicides should be kept away from wells and other sources of drinking water, he said. “We always say, ‘If you don’t want to drink it, keep it away from the well,’” Bush said.Abandoned wells should be filled in.Well testing can be done through local UGA Extension offices. A bacterial test is available for $35. An expanded water test, which tests for minerals, soluble salts and alkalinity, is $45. Call 1-800-ASK-UGA1 for more information.Once a water sample is tested, the well owner will get a report showing results that are above EPA’s primary and secondary maximum levels. If a water sample tests positive for bacteria, a chlorination treatment is recommended.(April Sorrow is a news editor with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)last_img read more

Seven line up for Liverpool Paradise

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