Taekwondo at the Military World Games

first_imgBy Dialogo July 15, 2011 In taekwondo, the fight takes place in a ten-meter by ten-meter area, and each match has three two-minute rounds. Four referees govern the fights. Points are obtained for the blows struck by the athletes, who can use both their feet and their hands. However, kicks may strike any part of the opponent’s body above the waist. Punches may strike only the opponent’s chest, with a closed fist. In order to win a match, the fighter must obtain a knockout – a ten-second count when one of the contenders falls. Otherwise, the decision will be on points or by the disqualification of the opponent. If there is a tie, a fourth round will be added, a sudden-death round likewise lasting two minutes. Taekwondo originated in Korea as a form of self-defense. Its goal is to defend oneself and to attack the enemy, using one’s hands freely. As an Olympic sport, it first appeared at the Seoul Games in 1988, as an exhibition. It was only in Sydney in 2000 that it became official.last_img read more

​Man Utd hoping to secure three more signings

first_imgManchester United are hoping to seal three more signings before the transfer window closes. The Red Devils have only secured Donny van de Beek for the first team. The Dutch midfielder arrives to provide competition in those positions. According to the Manchester Evening News, United want to sign Sergio Reguilon from Real Madrid, along with a centre-back and striker. read also:Man Utd prepare massive bid for Dortmund star valued at £108mAdvertisement Loading… They do want Jadon Sancho, but may be priced out of a move for the Borussia Dortmund winger. Their forward targets include Moussa Dembele, Joshua King and others. It is unclear who they would chase at centre-back, but David Upamecano is a long term target. However, the Frenchman may be pursued next term. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 center_img Promoted ContentWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?The Most Exciting Cities In The World To Visit7 Of The Wealthiest Universities In The World10 Phones That Can Easily Fit In The Smallest Pocket6 Interesting Ways To Make Money With A DroneInsane 3D Spraying Skills Turn In Incredible Street ArtThe 10 Best Secondary Education Systems In The WorldA Soviet Shot Put Thrower’s Record Hasn’t Been Beaten To This DayBest Car Manufacturers In The WorldBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever MadeCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable WayBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For Themlast_img read more

Other Sports Athletics Federation of India refers to Hima’s ‘not so fluent’ English, attracts severe backlash

first_imgNew Delhi: The Athletics Federation of India (AFI) on Friday got it all wrong when it referred to Hima Das’ “not so fluent english” after her historic run at the world under-20 championships, attracting the anger of fans which forced the governing body to issue an apology in chaste Hindi.The daughter of a farmer from a village in Assam’s Nagaon district, Hima scripted history by becoming the first Indian woman to win a gold at the IAFF World U-20 Athletics Championships, finishing first in the women’s 400 metre final race in Tampere, Finland.”#HimaDas speking to media after her SF win at #iaaftampere2018 @iaaforg Not so fluent in English but she gave her best there too. So proud of u #HimaDas Keep rocking & yeah,try ur best in final!” the AFI wrote on its twitter handle.Fans expressed their displeasure agaisnt the AFI for using what could be interpreted as insensitive. Miffed, fans ridiculed the tweet and said Das was in Finland to showcase her talent in athletics and not her expertise in english language.”She has landed in Tampere for displaying her talent in track and not in English. Shame on you for what you said,” read one tweet.”She has not been featured by the IAAF for her English speaking skills,we have lot of good English speakers in India but very few who can run like her,” said another.The severe backlash was followed by a clarification by the AFI.”We apologise to the country if our tweet hurt sentiments. We merely wanted to show that Hima is fearless whether on the track or outside. Despite being from a small village, she spoke freely with the foreign media. We apologise again to those who were offended,” translated a tweet which was posted in Hindi by the AFI.The 18-year-old Das finished the race in just 51.46s to win the gold.She now joins star javelin thrower Neeraj Chopra, who won a gold in Poland in the last edition in 2016 in a world record effort.Das is the first Indian track athlete to have won a medal in the history of this competition.The previous medal winners at the World Junior Championships were Seema Punia (bronze in discus in 2002) and Navjeet Kaur Dhillon (bronze in discus in 2014). For all the Latest Sports News News, Other Sports News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps.last_img read more

Short-handed Orange roster may become even thinner this weekend

first_img Published on October 31, 2013 at 1:10 am Contact Ryan: [email protected] Facebook Twitter Google+ Every week during practice, Syracuse assistant coach Erin Little literally must work as a coach on the court.Due to Syracuse only having 11 players it uses on the roster, Little, who played at SU from 2008-11, must practice with the team every day just so it can run six-on-six scrimmages during practice.But as Syracuse heads on the road this weekend to take on No. 18 Duke (18-3, 9-1 Atlantic Coast) on Friday at 6:30 p.m. and Wake Forest (14-8, 3-7) on Saturday at 6:30, its already small roster may be shrinking. Gosia Wlaszczuk did not play last weekend, although she practiced Tuesday and dressed for SU’s (10-12, 5-5) victory over Clemson on Sunday. Redshirt freshman Valeriya Shaipova, who has played a key role in the Orange’s recent victories, left the court on crutches Tuesday after it appeared her knee gave out at the end of practice.While the Orange travels south with a short-sided bench, its opponents, the Blue Devils and the Demon Deacons, have 15 and 12 players, respectively.“I know it is unfortunate when we have injuries, we don’t really have a lot of subs,” redshirt junior captain Lindsay McCabe said. “But again, the benefit of having a small team is that we’re all really close.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“We’re all used to playing with each other. Everyone’s a contributor so that always builds good team morale.”Having a smaller team limits some of the things the team can do in practice, as evidenced by Little, a coach needing to practice with her players.Teams such as No. 2 Penn State, which has 19 players on its roster, have the advantage of being able to do more in practice. Teams with larger roster sizes cannot only do six-on-six scrimmages without the coaches, but also more positional specific drills that improve techniques specific to position, Little said.Having a large roster size can slow a young player’s development, though. On game days, many players never get to see the court. This can be hard when younger players begin to get starting opportunities when they are older, but have not had much match experience.“When you have a larger team, a lot of the girls are on the bench,” Little said. “They don’t get to see as much playing time, and it’s hard that way.”Little, who also has experience playing with small rosters and large roster sizes, believes as a coach she can better develop her players with a smaller team.“With a small roster, you know you can keep it, the group tight,” Little said. “You can work more in depth with players. So like rather than having to focus on 18, you can focus on just the 11, focus on getting them better.”Although several players on the team said that they enjoy the small roster, many would argue that teams like Penn State have had so much success with a larger roster size for a reason.For sophomore Silvi Uattara, however, she does not believe that the team would improve if it had more players.“Our team is small but we’re all really close and really good friends,” Uattara said. “I don’t think that if we had more players on the roster we would be better.” Commentslast_img read more

Learn from Alia – Lamey

first_imgHandel Lamey, president of the Amateur Swimming Association of Jamaica (ASAJ), wants upcoming local swimmers to learn as much as possible from the global swim star Alia Atkinson before she retires.”From here, she has a lot of experience out there in the international events, it’s just for her to be able to share with our younger swimmers, who are coming up, and she was able to do that in Windsor, Canada recently. We had a young team with her,” he told The Gleaner.Lamey continued that the budding athletes were able to learn from Atkinson and see competition at that level, noting it will help position them to learn from her before she transitions out of the sport.”She (Atkinson) has tremendous motivation and focus, and I think that is something that augers well for her, and also for the swimmers that are coming up, we are hoping they can learn from her to really emulate her,” Lamey pointed out.Atkinson recently won three medals at the Short Course (SC) World Championships and broke the 50m breaststroke SC world record, despite failing to pick up her long sought Olympic medal.”After the Olympics, that was really disappointing for her. I know that she was expecting to do very well there because she was coming off a period that she equalled the world record at the time and then she broke it, so she was expecting big things and it just didn’t work that way,” Lamey underlinedHe remarked with pleasure that the 28-year-old was able to bounce back after her Olympics disappointments, while describing the publicity she has given the local swim fraternity as “immense”.”She gives us tremendous publicity, not only here in Jamaica, but overseas. Once we are on tours with the senior team and once we call her name, we here in Jamaica get the publicity because she is born and bred, and we automatically get that level of exposure because when you look out there in the swimming environment, there are not many black swimmers,” added the local swim boss.Lamey stressed that the upcoming youngsters will be able to learn from some of the challenges Atkinson has faced over the years, which she was able to overcome.Atkinson is a nominee for the RJR Sports Foundational 2016 National Sportswoman of the Year award.She previously won the award in 2014.last_img read more