On the picket line

first_imgVictory for Hot & Crusty workersMahoma Lopez, organizer for Laundry Workers Center, announces victory in Hot & Crusty strike.WW photo: Anne PrudenAt a press conference called by the Laundry Workers Center on Nov. 16, Hot & Crusty workers announced that they will return triumphantly to their workplace at 63rd Street and Second Avenue on Dec. 17 after an 11-month struggle and a 56-day strike for their rights. Now represented by the Hot and Crusty Workers Association, the courageous immigrant workers won a historic, precedent-setting three-year contract that includes a wage increase, paid vacation and sick time, a union hiring hall, and seniority, grievance and arbitration procedures. Mahoma Lopez, who has worked at that H&C shop for seven years, said this struggle was about “workers having a chance to be leaders.” He noted that the workers are especially excited about the hiring hall because “now we can control who gets hired.” Lopez added that they were victorious because “we’ve received a lot of support!” That was affirmed by the numerous solidarity statements by union representatives who had rallied behind the struggle. The press conference ended with the chant: “There are no borders in the workers’ struggle! ¡La lucha trabajadora no tiene frontera!” A victory party for the workers and a fundraiser for the Laundry Workers Center will be held Nov. 29 at the Solidarity Center, 55 West 17th St., Manhattan, from 9 to 11 p.m. For more information, call 212-633-6646.Bakers’ strike exposes Hostess mismanagementThe bakers who make Twinkies and Wonder Bread went on strike Nov. 9 to protest draconian concessions demanded by Hostess Brands. But the company, already in bankruptcy, retaliated Nov. 16 by filing to liquidate and throw 18,500 workers out of work. Hostess claimed the strike forced them to shut their doors, which corporate media have reported ad nauseam. But the Bakery Workers union (Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco Workers and Grain Millers) exposed the real reason: the company is drowning in debt — after years of flagrant mismanagement and an earlier bankruptcy. The bosses were so brazen, they gave themselves huge bonuses only days before the second bankruptcy. But the bakers refused to bail them out as they had done before. According to David B. Durkee, the union secretary-treasurer, the workers were advised that they would be “facing liquidation in 12 to 16 months from now, even if we took more concessions.” (New York Times, Nov. 20) After the bankruptcy judge ordered mediation Nov. 19 between Hostess and the union, he agreed Nov. 21 to let the company sell off its brands to the highest bidders for an estimated $1 billion. (Bloomberg News, Nov. 26) And many baking companies, including Pepperidge Farm, Flower Foods and Grupo Bimbo, as well as financial investors, are eager to buy the popular brands. But what will happen to the workers and their unions? Stay tuned.Car washers strike in Bronx, N.Y.After not being paid for three weeks, more than a dozen workers at the Sunny Day Car Wash in the Bronx, N.Y., walked off the job Nov. 11. Later that day they were fired. After consulting workers at the nearby Webster Car Wash, who had just joined the Department Store union (RWDSU), the mostly immigrant workers called an unfair-labor-practice strike on Nov. 13 to demand back pay, their jobs and union recognition. “We’re tired of this. We’re working in the cold. We need money to pay our rent,” Nelson Aquino told the Nov. 13 Daily News. Aquino earns $5.50 an hour plus tips drying cars. “Even when they give us a check, it bounces because there’s no funds.” This was the first strike in the WASH New York campaign, a joint effort of Make the Road New York and New York Communities for Change, supported by RWDSU. With 5,000 low-wage, mostly immigrant workers at more than 200 car washes in New York City, the industry is known for exploiting its workforce, paying below minimum wages and not paying overtime. Workers at two car washes voted overwhelmingly to join RWDSU in September.NY Times workers fight cutbacksPrint and digital workers at the New York Times, including writers, and other editorial and administrative staff represented by The Newspaper Guild of New York, Communication Workers Local 31003, voted to ratify a three-year contract on Nov. 13. During a 21-month struggle, which included several public statements (saveourtimes.com) and a picket line on Oct. 25, the workers battled major concessions on wages, pensions and health benefits. The Sept. 24 open letter to management called the cutbacks “untenable and destructive.” Like many newspapers in the U.S., the NYT has been losing money for years, a combination of sharply reduced advertising and subscription revenue, and millions spent developing its website. Adopting capitalism’s worst anti-worker tactics in this dead-end economic crisis, management tried to make the workers pay, while lavishing generous salaries and bonuses on top-tier management, which the Guild denounced. The new contract retains a defined benefit pension plan, increased overall compensation and, for the first time, a bonus plan starting in 2014. (NYT, Nov. 14) This is yet another example of why it pays to fight back.American Sugar fined for safety violationsThe 1,300 highly skilled workers at American Crystal Sugar, located in Iowa, Minnesota and North Dakota, have been locked out for 15 months because the bosses refuse to pay them a fair wage and want to break their union. Meanwhile, ACS hired untrained replacement workers. No wonder inspectors from Iowa’s Occupational Safety and Health Enforcement division issued nearly $50,000 in fines Oct. 9 after finding serious safety violations — a dangerous buildup of combustible sugar dust. That’s what caused a 2008 explosion at Imperial Sugar in Port Wentworth, Ga., which killed 14 workers. To support the workers, sign a petition demanding that ACS immediately end the lockout at tinyurl.com/d9yhymu. nFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

HRock Church: The Power of Blessing

first_img Top of the News Community News Community News 9 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Faith Essays & Inspirations HRock Church: The Power of Blessing By PASTOR CHE AHN, HROCK CHURCH Published on Monday, January 13, 2014 | 11:35 am Make a comment Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Herbeauty7 Things A Man Will Do Only If He Really Loves YouHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThe Most Heartwarming Moments Between Father And DaughterHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Strong Female TV Characters Who Deserve To Have A SpinoffHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty8 Celebrities Who’ve Lost Their FandomsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty8 Easy Exotic Meals Anyone Can MakeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty7 Most Startling Movie Moments We Didn’t Realize Were InsensitiveHerbeautyHerbeauty Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *center_img More Cool Stuff EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS As a young black child living in inner-city Detroit, Ben Carson looked like an early failure just waiting to happen. His parents divorced when he was 8, and he reacted to the loss of his father by becoming angry and aggressive. He had a violent temper and frequently assaulted his peers at the slightest provocation. He lost interest in school and by the time he was in 4th grade, he was at the bottom of his class.As a single parent with little education and no real employment skills, Ben’s mother worked 2 and 3 jobs just to make ends meet. Often this meant she was away from home from 5 AM to 11 PM, and Ben would go days at a time without seeing her. Ben’s clothing was from the Goodwill and his classmates teased him, which was a constant source of embarrassment.Ben seemed to be on the fast track to becoming a school dropout and getting involved with substance abuse and/or gang membership. But Ben had a powerful advantage that many children in his position lack. Ben’s mother believed in her son and had positive expectations for him. She limited his television time, made his outdoor play contingent upon completing homework first, and required him to read two library books each week and write a written book report.Ben would have absolutely rebelled at this regimen, but his mother did one more all-important thing. She constantly encouraged him and praised his efforts, frequently reminding him that he could become anything he chose to work for. She was convinced he would go far. She displayed interest in the books he read, and scrutinized his written reports carefully.Spurred on by his mother’s approval, Ben began to love reading and the world of knowledge it opened to him. By the end of the 5th grade he was at the top of his class, amazing his teachers. He graduated with top honors from high school, attended Yale, then medical school, and became the Director of Pediatric Neurosurgery at Johns Hopkins at the young age of 33. In 1987 he gained international acclaim by being the first neurosurgeon to successfully separate 8-month-old twins joined at the head.Ben Carson’s story is more than just a heartwarming tale. It is a striking example of the power of blessing in the life and destiny of a person. Ben’s mother continually planted positive words about him in his mind and heart. The power of her blessing opened the doors of a great destiny for him.About now you may be thinking “I wish I had someone like that at my back. Someone who really believed in me and encouraged me.” I have good news for you. Father God totally believes in you and wants you to have a great destiny. Psalm 21 assures us, “You (Father God) have given him his heart’s desire, and have not withheld the request of his lips, for you meet him with rich blessings. You make him most blessed forever. You make him glad with the joy of your presence.”As you begin 2014, keep your mind and heart focused on Father God’s many blessings to you. Remember that He is totally for you and as the apostle Paul put it, “If God is for us, who can be against us?” (Romans 8:31)Please join us this Sunday at 9:00 a.m., 11:00 a.m. or 2:00 p.m. I’m beginning a new series entitled The Power of Blessing. This Sunday my message is entitled, “The 10 Decrees of Blessing, part I”. We will corporately begin to decree God’s promises over your life in this New Year.Pastor CheHRock Church, 131 S. St. John Avenue, Pasadena, (626) 794-1199 or visit www.hrockchurch.com. Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Subscribe First Heatwave Expected Next Week faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Business News Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

Limerick Council urged to help tackle crime in Askeaton

first_imgEmail Cllr Kevin Sheahanby Alan [email protected] up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Cllr Kevin SheahanFORMER Mayor Cllr Kevin Sheahan has called on Limerick City and County Council to introduce a programme to help deal with criminality in Askeaton.Speaking at this month’s Adare-Rathkeale district meeting, the Fianna Fail councillor claimed there was a section of the local community who never worked a day in their lives, living off social welfare benefits, while the remainder of the population “suffers”.He suggested that “work, training or learning” would be beneficial and called on the local authority to draft a proposal to help alleviate antisocial behaviour in the town.“The issue of antisocial behaviour and criminality is one that the people in Askeaton are facing every day and every night. It is being ignored by local government and I would like to see the council putting together a programme,” Cllr Sheahan suggested.He later took umbrage at the fact that none of his council colleagues seconded his proposal and he told them that he was “devastated”.However, fellow councillors informed Cllr Sheahan that he had not put a formal proposal to the floor.Independent councillor Emmett O’Brien then called for an amendment to be added, indicating that they were working to “unify the community” and avoid any perception of “driving a wedge” between people.“We need to have the community working together,” said Cllr O’Brien.“It is our responsibility to ensure that everybody is treated equally and with fairness so we are all working together for the betterment of the town. Anything else would be borderline stupid”, he added.Cllr Sheahan then accused Cllr O’Brien of saying he was stupid and called on him to withdraw his comment.“Borderline incorrect,” Cllr O’Brien responded.Sinn Fein councillor Ciara McMahon asked that the community traveller liaison officer be party to any such draft proposal. TAGSAdare-Rathkeale municipal districtantisocial behaviourAskeatonCllr Ciara McMahonCllr Emmett O’BrienCllr Kevin SheahanCrimeFianna FáillimerickLimerick City and County CouncilSinn Fein Advertisement Previous articleRusangano Family line up a busy 2016Next articleDream of a City: poem for the day Alan Jacqueshttp://www.limerickpost.ie Twitter Linkedin Minister Patrick O’ Donovan announces opening of Limerick heritage site to the public for the first time Print Calls to clean the River Deel in Rathkeale center_img Gardaí to teach lesson on dangers of scramblers WhatsApp NewsLocal NewsLimerick Council urged to help tackle crime in AskeatonBy Alan Jacques – December 21, 2015 793 Facebook RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Pedestrian crossing falls ‘out of the sky’ in Pallaskenry Askeaton/ Ballysteen bring Easter joy to local community Adare-Rathkeale district in need of ‘plain-speaking’ voicelast_img read more