Wallabies vs Wales 2012 – 2nd Test – Full Match

first_imgWednesday Jun 20, 2012 Wallabies vs Wales 2012 – 2nd Test – Full Match Watch the full second Test between the Wallabies and Wales, in Melbourne. You can also view shorter highlights of the game here.Time: 01:52:52Credit: Original capper and the uploaderADVERTISEMENT Posted By: rugbydump Share Send Thanks Sorry there has been an error Full Matches Related Articles 52 WEEKS AGO FULL MATCH: Umaga, Rokocoko, McAlister and… 54 WEEKS AGO FULL MATCH: Lions upset world champion Springboks… 58 WEEKS AGO FULL MATCH: Scotland and Samoa go down to… From the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedUrologists Stunned: Forget the Blue Pill, This “Fixes” Your EDSmart Life ReportsYou Won’t Believe What the World’s Most Beautiful Girl Looks Like TodayNueeyDoctors Stunned: She Removes Her Wrinkles With This Inexpensive TipSmart Life Reports30+ Everyday Items with a Secret Hidden PurposeNueeyIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

Video: Georgia Releases “A Call To Action” Video Ahead Of Spring Game

first_imgUniversity of Georgia stands during a football game.Georgia’s first-year head coach Kirby Smart is set to show off his team for the the first time in front of the home crowd Saturday afternoon at the spring game. With so much excitement surrounding the program, it’s worth taking a moment to appreciate how UGA got here. So, to make sure fans are all caught up, Georgia posted this awesome “A Call To Action” video to its official Vimeo page to highlight the Bulldogs’ short journey under Smart.Georgia’s spring game is scheduled to kick off Saturday afternoon at 4 p.m.last_img

Trumps budget balloons deficits cuts social safety net

first_imgWASHINGTON – President Donald Trump unveiled a $4.4 trillion budget plan Monday that envisions steep cuts to America’s social safety net but mounting spending on the military, formally retreating from last year’s promises to balance the federal budget.The president’s spending outline for the first time acknowledges that the Republican tax overhaul passed last year would add billions to the deficit and not “pay for itself” as Trump and his Republican allies asserted. If enacted as proposed, though no presidential budget ever is, the plan would establish an era of $1 trillion-plus yearly deficits.The open embrace of red ink is a remarkable public reversal for Trump and his party, which spent years objecting to President Barack Obama’s increased spending during the depths of the Great Recession. Rhetoric aside, however, Trump’s pattern is in line with past Republican presidents who have overseen spikes in deficits as they simultaneously increased military spending and cut taxes.“We’re going to have the strongest military we’ve ever had, by far,” Trump said in an Oval Office appearance Monday. “In this budget we took care of the military like it’s never been taken care of before.”Trump’s budget revived his calls for big cuts to domestic programs that benefit the poor and middle class, such as food stamps, housing subsidies and student loans. Retirement benefits would remain mostly untouched by Trump’s plan, as he has pledged, though Medicare providers would absorb about $500 billion in cuts — a nearly 6 per cent reduction. Some beneficiaries in Social Security’s disability program would have to re-enter the workforce under proposed changes to eligibility rules.While all presidents’ budgets are essentially dead on arrival — Congress writes and enacts its own spending legislation — Trump’s plan was dead before it landed. It came just three days after the president signed a bipartisan agreement that set broad parameters for spending over the next two years. That deal, which includes large increases for domestic programs, rendered Monday’s Trump plan for 10-year, $1.7 trillion cuts to domestic agencies such as the departments of Health and Human Services, Agriculture and Housing and Urban Development even more unrealistic.The White House used Monday’s event to promote its long-awaited plan to increase funding for infrastructure. The plan would put up $200 billion in federal money over the next 10 years in hopes of leveraging a total of $1.5 trillion in infrastructure spending, relying on state and local governments and the private sector to contribute the bulk of the funding.But after his aides talked up that plan over the weekend, Trump suggested that his infrastructure proposal wasn’t a big deal for him.“If for any reason, they don’t want to support to it, hey, that’s going to be up to them,” he said of the Republican-controlled Congress. “What was very important to me was the military; what was very important to me was the tax cuts.”Trump also is proposing work requirements for several federal programs, including housing subsidies, food stamps and Medicaid. Such ideas have backing from powerful figures in Congress including Republican House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wisconsin, who promises action on a “workforce development” agenda this year.There was immediate opposition from Democrats.“The Trump budget proposal makes clear his desire to enact massive cuts to health care, anti-poverty programs and investments in economic growth to blunt the deficit-exploding impact of his tax cuts for millionaires and corporations,” said Rep. John Yarmuth of Kentucky, the top Democrat on the House Budget Committee.Some Republicans, on the other hand, said spending was much too high.“This budget continues too much of Washington’s wasteful spending — it does not balance in ten years, and it creates a deficit of over a trillion dollars next year,” said Rep. Matt Gaetz of Florida. “We cannot steal from America’s future to pay for spending todayTrump’s plan aims at other familiar targets. It would eliminate the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, the National Endowment for the Arts and National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Institute of Museum and Library Services. The administration wants NASA out of the International Space Station by 2025 and private businesses running the place instead.But the domestic cuts would be far from enough to make up for the plummeting tax revenue projected in the budget.Trump’s plan sees a 2019 deficit of $984 billion, though White House Budget Director Mick Mulvaney admits $1.2 trillion is more plausible after last week’s congressional budget pact and $90 billion worth of disaster aid is tacked on. That would be more than double the 2019 deficit the administration promised last year.All told, the new budget sees accumulating deficits of $7.2 trillion over the coming decade; Trump’s plan last year projected a 10-year shortfall of $3.2 trillion. And that’s assuming Trump’s rosy economic predictions come true and Congress follows through — in an election year — with politically toxic cuts to social programs, farm subsidies and Medicare providers.Last year Trump’s budget promised such ideas could generate a small budget surplus by 2027; now, his best-case scenario is for a $450 billion deficit that year, more than $300 billion of which can be traced to his December tax cut.In stark numbers, the budget rewrites the administration’s talking points for last year’s tax plan, which administration figures such as Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin promised would more than pay for itself.“Not only will this tax plan pay for itself, but it will pay down debt,” Mnuchin declared in September.Instead, Trump’s budget projects that tax revenues will plummet by $3.7 trillion over the 2018-27 decade relative to last year’s “baseline” estimates.The budget also includes $1.6 billion for the second stage of Trump’s proposed border wall, a 65-mile segment in Texas’ Rio Grande Valley. Trump’s request last year for 74 miles of wall in San Diego and the Rio Grande Valley is pending before lawmakers right now.Once again, there’s no mention of how Mexico would have to pay for it, as Trump repeatedly promised during the presidential campaign and after his victory.The plan reprises proposals to curb crop insurance costs, cut student loan subsidies and reduce pension benefits for federal workers. They went nowhere last year.Trump’s plan promises 3 per cent growth for the nation’s economy, continuing low inflation and low interest yields on U.S. Treasury bills despite a flood of new borrowing. That likely underestimates the mounting cost of financing the government’s $20 trillion-plus debt, many economists say.Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody’s Analytics, said a surge in stimulus from higher government spending and tax cuts would boost growth but for only for a short time.“This will meaningfully raise the odds that after juiced-up growth in 2018 and 2019, we will get a much weaker economy, possibly a recession in the next decade,” Zandi said. “In good times, budget policy should be working to get the deficits down because bad times are sure to come.”last_img read more

Man injured in early morning shooting in Grande Prairie

first_imgGRANDE PRAIRIE, A.B. – Mounties in Grande Prairie were called out to a shooting early Tuesday morning at Evergreen Park.Upon arrival, police located a man inside a trailer suffering from a single gunshot wound.The 62-year-old man was transported to a local hospital where he remains in stable condition. Police believe this was not a random act and that there is no additional risk to public safety.The RCMP say they are continuing to investigate the incident.Anyone with information about the shooting is asked to call the Grande Prairie RCMP Detachment at 780-830-5700 or call your local police detachment. Should you wish to remain anonymous you can contact Crime Stoppers by phone at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS) or by internet at www.tipsubmit.com.last_img

The future development of the TseKwa caves in Charlie Lake

first_imgRezoning Report; CLICK HERETreaty 8; CLICK HERESimon Fraser University Research; CLICK HERENorthwest Coast Archeology; CLICK HERE FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – A rezoning application has been submitted to the Peace River Regional District to restore and protect the previously known Charlie Lake Caves, now Tse’K’wa land, by establishing an Indigenous cultural museum.Gary Oker, President of Tse’K’wa Heritage Society, shares the Tse’K’wa holds deep historical and cultural importance. The goal is to recreate the space to what it would have looked like in the stone age, to include an amphitheatre space as well as buildings to display the vast collection in 1000 piece range of found artifacts from the site.Oker says it would become a space for ceremonies, drumming and different things could be shared such as food, traditional song and stories for people to come and enjoy the history. It is important to Oker to increase the visibility of the indigenous people in the area. March 18th, 2019 there will be an open house at the Charlie Lake Community Hall. As the proper steps are being taken to rezone the land, Oker wants an opportunity to share with the Community what the vision for the land will be.The Simon Fraser University recognized Tse’K’wa as a significant space because of the historical content that was found and unearthed as it was being studied by the University.Oker said this will be a place that provides an opportunity for school children to come and learn as well as being a point of interest for tourism and visitors to the area and passing along the Alaska Hwy.To date, the biggest challenge Oker says they face is the defacing of the caves and he hopes that with the development of the site the cultural importance will be recognized so everyone can enjoy the land.Also represented is Diane Bigfoot, Director from Prophet River and Laura Webb, Director from West Moberly.For more information on the caves and report follow the links below.last_img read more

Steals Are Predictive But Are They That Important

This is the final part of my four-part response to questions and comments stemming from my article “The Hidden Value of the NBA Steal.” Here are Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3.Near the beginning of my article on steals, I made the following claim:If you had to pick one statistic from the common box score to tell you as much as possible about whether a player helps or hurts his team, it isn’t how many points he scores. Nor how many rebounds he grabs. Nor how many assists he dishes out.It’s how many steals he gets.My argument went like this: Steals are super-valuable predictors relative to other box score stats. They are “worth” — predictively —  as much as nine points because they’re more difficult to replace than other stats.But a number of astute readers noticed something missing. Here’s commenter Mike Schloat:I struggle with the real life value of steals when looked at in this way since there are SO SO few of them. Averaging 2.5 steals — finishing a game with 2 as often as you finish with 3 — is such a minuscule part of the game, and frighteningly random when you actually look at what sometimes constitutes a steal.It’s a fair point. Because steals are so rare, they could be much more predictive than other box score stats on the margins and still be less important overall. And in the original article, I didn’t show that marginal steals are such a great predictor that, despite being so rare, they are still the most valuable predictor.So let me address that concern. There are two levels we need to consider: The first is how rare steals are relative to other events recorded in the box score, and the other is how much steals vary from player to player, relative to how much other stats vary from player to player.For example, in my dataset, players who played more than 20 minutes averaged .92 steals and .55 blocks per game. But the standard deviations — the typical amount that any particular player is likely to differ from an average player — were .43 steals and .59 blocks.One way to judge how skilled a player is at a particular thing is to measure how many standard deviations they are above average. These values fluctuate, but the difference between Ricky Rubio (the league leader this year) and an average player is about a steal and a half, making him a little over three standard deviations above average for the steals per game stat.To judge a stat’s overall predictivity, what we want to know is the extent to which a player’s skill in that stat predicts his overall value (measured by the impact on his team’s performance by his playing or not). For example, if a player is two standard deviations above average in steals per game but only one standard deviation above average in points per game, how does his value compare to a player who is the reverse?To figure this out, we can run a regression similar to the one in the original article. But instead of using a player’s raw box score stats as our variables, we use his standardized stats; that is, the number of standard deviations the player is above or below the mean for each. The relative size of the coefficients (how much a stat should be weighted) that this type of regression spits out tells us the relative predictive importance of each stat overall.Here are the results of such a regression, from the player’s standardized box score stats to his impact on team win percentage. I’ve listed the relative size of each stat’s coefficient (weight) as a percentage of the whole — reflecting the percentage of information about a player’s value that comes from each (note that turnover value is negative, I’ve converted it to a positive “skill at not giving up turnovers” for purposes of comparison):This was the finding behind the claim that of all the basic box score totals, steals are the most predictive. It may be less sexy than nine points, but it’s pretty remarkable that a skill that comes up so infrequently can be so important.Of course, there are a lot of different ways to structure this kind of regression: You have to decide which types of variables to use, how advanced they should be, whether to use game-based or play-based data, and what specific difference to predict.So, why am I analyzing this particular group of stats at all?I made a list of all the people who use points, rebounds and assists per game in their analysis and reporting more often than steals per game:Almost all sports reportersAlmost all sports commentatorsAlmost all sports columnistsAlmost all sports fansEstablishing the predictive ability of box score stats is only a tiny step toward improving our understanding of the dynamics of basketball. But, like the steal itself, it has outsize importance. read more

The NFLs New Defensive Rules Probably Arent Going To Make A Difference

Every offseason, NFL officials make an instructional video that highlights new rules and gives players a warning about which existing ones will be called more tightly in the upcoming season. This year, officials say they’re going to key in on defensive holding and illegal contact, ensuring they’re called correctly.According to reporting by ESPN’s Jeffri Chadiha, officials became concerned that those particular penalties were not being called as often as they were a decade ago. (Conspiracy theorists, on the other hand, blamed the Seattle Seahawks’ dominant defensive performance against Peyton Manning’s record-setting Denver Broncos offense in the Super Bowl.) With an assist from the data of Pro-Football-Reference.com, we wondered if the official rationale holds up: Have illegal contact and defensive holding really been called less (on a per-pass basis) in recent seasons?In the case of illegal contact, yes. In 2004, Indianapolis Colts general manager Bill Polian spent the offseason lobbying the NFL Competition Committee to more strictly enforce the illegal contact rule in the wake of his team’s 24-14 playoff defeat against the New England Patriots (a game in which Manning — then playing for Indianapolis — tossed four interceptions).As the chart below shows, referees began calling the penalty much more often the very next season, a 15-year high point. Since then, the penalty’s frequency has steadily receded.However, the pattern is less obvious with defensive holding, which also peaked around the middle of the decade but reversed its decline by 2010, and was near its 15-year high just last season. It doesn’t seem to be a penalty in need of greater emphasis.Then again, concerns about the wisdom of placing more restrictions on defenders in an already pass-happy league may be largely academic. At least in terms of illegal contact and defensive holding, there doesn’t seem to be any relationship between the frequency of either penalty being called and the NFL’s overall level of passing efficiency (as measured by Adjusted Net Yards Per Attempt).The last time the NFL cracked down on holding and contact by defenders, it didn’t make any noticeable dent in the rising trend of passing efficiency. Pass offenses have steadily become more and more efficient over the last decade and a half — but that’s part of a longterm trend of increased passing efficacy, not because of the rule changes inspired by Polian a decade ago. The same will likely be true for the changes made this offseason as well. read more

Commentary Decision to elect game captains unfair to Buckeyes proven leaders

Luke Fickell hasn’t even endured his first game as the head coach yet, but he’s already made his first mistake. After a summer full of speculation about which players would lead the team onto the field as OSU’s captains this fall, Fickell announced Tuesday that he would be departing from the program’s tradition of selecting season-long captains. Instead, Fickell said that the team will be choosing captains on a game-by-game basis. The reasoning behind Fickell’s decision is pretty clear; it would be tough to select OSU’s typical four to six captains without including one of four Buckeye seniors who are suspended for the first five games of the 2011 season for receiving impermissible benefits. The decision to select captains on a game-by-game basis essentially rewards DeVier Posey, Mike Adams, Daniel “Boom” Herron and Solomon Thomas by giving them the opportunity to be selected after they return from their suspensions, but that’s not where I have a problem. My issue with Fickell’s decision is the indirect punishment for players who would likely have been season-long captains, regardless of the transgressions committed by the aforementioned players. Even if Posey, Adams, Herron, and Thomas had not been suspended for the start of the 2011 season, it’s almost certain that senior center Michael Brewster would be representing the Buckeyes at midfield for each coin toss this upcoming fall. Brewster committed to OSU during his junior year of high school in Orlando, Fla., but even before then, he was helping recruit a top-rated 2008 recruiting class to Columbus that would go on to be nicknamed the “Brew Crew.” Upon arriving at OSU, all Brewster has done is become a four-year starter and the face of a team who was in desperate need of one when turmoil struck last December. He could have been named a captain as a junior and nobody would have batted an eye. Now it appears he won’t even be a captain for all of his senior season. The absence of season-long defensive captains is even more absurd considering that the only suspended Buckeye on that side of the ball — Thomas — happens to be a back-up. So, thanks to the transgressions of a player who’s played sparingly throughout his time at OSU, a player like sixth-year defensive back Tyler Moeller, who’s bounced back from being the victim of an assault that cost him all of the 2009 season, and a torn pectoral that cost him most of the 2010 season, from being a season-long captain. Or what about senior linebacker Andrew Sweat, who is entering his second season as a starter at OSU and, despite having roomed with former quarterback Terrelle Pryor, has managed to keep his name out of the press for negative reasons?   You mean to tell me that he doesn’t deserve to be a season-long captain? I’ll grant Fickell that allowing players to vote for four (or in the case of last season, six) captains would have likely resulted in one of the suspended players — most likely Posey — being selected a captain, but that doesn’t mean that there weren’t better alternatives than electing game-by-game captains. One option would have been for Fickell to simply select Brewster, Moeller, and Sweat as the team’s three captains and say “that’s that.” Just because former coach Jim Tressel allowed his team to vote for captains doesn’t mean that Fickell needs to do the same. Another option would have been to allow the players to vote on captains and if a suspended player were to be selected, he could either be absent or replaced by a rotation of players for the first five games. There’s even a precedent for this —  during the 2009 season, three defensive captains were named and were then joined by a rotating offensive player each week. Now more than ever, the Buckeye football program needs stability in its leadership. Not just in its coaching staff, but in its players too. The idea of different captains on a game-by-game basis is anything but that. Fickell said that season captains will eventually be named, possibly at the team’s postseason banquet, which will be a nice moment for deserving players like Brewster, Moeller, and Sweat, even if it comes a few months too late. read more

Blue Jackets fall to Stars 42

Blue Jackets’ interim coach Todd Richards said he was pleased with the way his team battled back in Thursday’s game against the Dallas Stars, but it wasn’t enough in the end. “The problem was, we weren’t ready from the start,” he said. The Blue Jackets got second period power-play goals from center Vinny Prospal and left-winger Rick Nash, but came up short, losing, 4-2, against the Stars, at Nationwide Arena. The Stars used left-winger Jamie Benn’s two-goal effort to hold on for the victory. Defensemen Stephane Robidas and Alex Goligoski added the other markers for the Stars. Curtis Sanford stopped 31 shots for the Blue Jackets as the team attempted to go on its first three-game winning-streak of the season. “We really wanted to get that third win in a row,” said left-winger R.J. Umberger. The scoring started just 1:35 into the game after Benn spun around in the slot and fired a shot that beat Sanford high to the glove side. Things didn’t get any easier for the Blue Jackets. Just less than three minutes later, Blue Jackets’ defenseman Marc Methot was on the receiving end of a puck to the face. Stars’ center Tomas Vincour fired a shot from the slot that, after striking Methot in the face, fell to the crease for a tap-in by Goligoski to put the Stars up, 2-0. “The first five minutes really killed us and put us in a big hole,” Umberger said. Methot did not return to the game after suffering a broken jaw, Richards said. “To get hit like that is fluky,” Richards said. Methot was not the only casualty of the game as right-winger Jared Boll left the game with a broken foot, Richards said. “It was a tough night body-wise, as far as injuries,” Richards said. After giving up an early power-play goal in the second period to the Stars, the Blue Jackets finally took some of the momentum back and responded with two power-play goals of their own. With Stars’ defenseman Sheldon Souray off for roughing later in the second period, defenseman Fedor Tyutin fired a low shot from the point that Prospal redirected into the net for the Blue Jackets’ first tally, at 8:32. Then at 12:12 during another Stars’ penalty, center Derick Brassard slid a cross-ice pass over to Nash who buried it for his 18th goal of the season. Richards called the play “textbook” and said it was what the team worked on in practice. Nash said the power play was “definitely positive” and the team could take that away from the game. The Blue Jackets added sustained pressure in the third, but were not able to find the back of the net again. “It was tough in the third,” Nash said. Benn added an empty-net goal with less than 10 seconds to go to seal the victory for the Stars. Nash, despite complimenting the Stars’ execution in the third period, felt it was still up to his team to tie the game. “It was good play by them, but we’ve got to find a way to get chances in the third,” Nash said. Nash was still optimistic about the team’s play. “We’re giving ourselves a chance to win and it seems like we’re following our system a lot better,” he said. Umberger agreed that the team just needs to persevere. “We gotta keep fighting, keep playing hard,” he said. The Blue Jackets travel to Minnesota Saturday to take on the Wild at 8 p.m. for the final time this season. read more

DAngelo Russells 32 lead Ohio State mens basketball to 58point win

Freshman guard D’Angelo Russell (0) passes the ball during a game against Sacred Heart on Nov. 23 at the Schottenstein Center. OSU won, 106-48.Credit: Mark Batke / Photo editorThe Ohio State men’s basketball game against Sacred Heart was delayed for a matter of minutes because of a lighting conflict, but it didn’t keep the Buckeyes from lighting up the scoreboard once the game tipped off.The Buckeyes shot 56.4 percent from the floor in the first half and didn’t let up as they defeated the Pioneers, 106-48, Sunday night.The Buckeyes were led by freshman guard D’Angelo Russell, who scored an OSU season-high 32 points, coming up eight points shy of the school freshman single game scoring record.Jared Sullinger holds the freshman record with 40 in a game against Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis in December 2010.Russell said after the game he wasn’t trying to make up for only scoring six points against Marquette.“The last game was behind me at the end of that game. I didn’t think about it at all. The beginning of this game, I just tried to prep for it,” Russell said. “I didn’t honestly know who the opponent was, I just prepared the best way I could and I just told myself whoever was guarding me, I was going to destroy him.”Russell executed his plan well, as he added nine rebounds and shot 57.1 percent from the floor.Senior guard Shannon Scott, who compiled 25 combined assists in his first two games of the season, recorded a double-double and broke the OSU single game assist record as he tallied 16 helpers to pass the previous record of 15 set by Aaron Craft in 2011.After the game, Scott said that the record isn’t significant if the Buckeyes don’t continue to win games.“It doesn’t mean a lot, I mean it’s good to say that you have it, but I can’t really hold my head on that,” Scott said. “We want to win a lot more games and you can’t really focus on just having a record right now. We want to be the best team that we can be. We can kind of put the game behind us now and get ready for the next one.”OSU had 24 assists as a team, which coach Thad Matta said he was pleased with.“We did a great job of sharing the basketball,” Matta said after the game. “Shannon, 16 assists and whatever he had the other night, he has got a great command right now in terms of his demeanor and finding guys.”Matta put it as simple as he possibly could after the 58-point win.“That was a heck of a performance by our starting backcourt tonight,” he said.The Buckeyes never trailed as they opened up a 25-point lead at halftime as Russell, sophomore forward Marc Loving and senior forward Sam Thompson all scored in double figures in the opening 20 minutes.Thompson got the crowd of 12,941 at the Schottenstein Center out of their seats early with a trio of alley-oop slams in the first half, the last coming at the first-half buzzer off a lob from Russell.Russell said he gets just as much, if not more, excitement when his teammates make a play as compared to when he does.“They are both a crazy feeling. Sam is a crazy athlete,” Russell said. “Just throwing it up to him, knowing he is going to dunk it, I think it is more exciting when he is dunking the ball than me (scoring).”Thompson finished the night with 12 points on six-of-eight shooting.OSU shot a sweltering 56.9 percent for the game from the floor as all nine Buckeyes that played scored at least four points.Redshirt-senior forward Anthony Lee got his first career start as a Buckeye with senior center Amir Williams sitting out Sunday’s game with a sore right knee. Lee finished the night with six points and four rebounds.Matta said after the game that Williams was held out as a precaution, but could have played if needed.“It’s just been a lingering problem. I felt like we probably needed to hold him out one more night. He told me during the game, ‘Just so you know, I am playing on Wednesday,’” Matta said. “It’s nothing structural or anything like that. We have just been monitoring it and thinking big picture for him.”Senior center Trey McDonald led all players with 14 boards and added eight points in extended minutes with Williams out.Sacred Heart freshman center Filip Nowicki led the Pioneers with 10 points to go along with nine rebounds.The Buckeyes are set to return to action Wednesday against Campbell University. Tip is set for 7 p.m. at the Schottenstein Center. read more