Westridge Alum Diana Jue ’05 Named One of Forbes’ 2015 Under 30

first_img Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Herbeauty10 Of The Most Notorious Female Spies In HistoryHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHe Is Totally In Love With You If He Does These 7 ThingsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThese Lipsticks Are Designed To Make Your Teeth Appear Whiter!HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyInstall These Measures To Keep Your Household Safe From Covid19HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty9 Hollywood Divas Who Fell In Love With WomenHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Strong Female TV Characters Who Deserve To Have A SpinoffHerbeautyHerbeauty Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyCitizen Service CenterPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Community News Subscribe Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Business News Make a comment Top of the News center_img Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Diana Jue ’05 has been named one of Forbes’ 2015 “30 under 30” for her work as a socially conscious entrepreneur with Essmart, a distribution system that brings life-improving technologies – solar lanterns, non-electric water filters, rechargeable batteries, cook stoves that reduce smoke, and fuel use to poor areas in India.My time at Westridge taught me how to both care for and think critically about the lives of people around me, how to embrace diversity, and how to make something happen. Westridge influenced me so much that, when I arrived at MIT as a college freshman, I knew I couldn’t just be a regular, 9-5 engineer. At Westridge, I had been well-trained in the humanities and had been well-exposed to different types of thinking. This resulted in my being very creative with my undergraduate education, which was atypical for a MIT student, but perfectly fitting for me and my passions.”Diana and Essmart co-founder Jackie Stenson were 2014 Asia-Pacific winners of the Cartier Women’s Initative. They have also been named Echoing Green fellows and were featured on NPR in the fall.Westridge School, 324 Madeline Drive, Pasadena, (626) 799-1053 ext. 200 or visit www.westridge.org. More Cool Stuff 2 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it People Westridge Alum Diana Jue ’05 Named One of Forbes’ 2015 Under 30 Article and Photo courtesy of WESTRIDGE SCHOOL Published on Monday, January 12, 2015 | 6:49 pm First Heatwave Expected Next Week Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Community Newslast_img read more

Protest planned in Limerick after Irish Cement given green light to…

first_imgLimerick centre needed to tackle environmental issues Minister asked to review need for more incinerators in Limerick Print Facebook Twitter NewsEnvironmentProtest planned in Limerick after Irish Cement given green light to burn alternative fuelsBy David Raleigh – September 20, 2019 1043 WhatsApp Linkedin Email Opponents of Irish Cement’s incinerator plan taking part in a protest march in 2018 in Limerick.Photo: Cian ReinhardtA protest march is to take place in Limerick next month after controversial plans by Irish Cement Limited to burn alternative fuels, including used tyres, were given the green light by the EPA, subject to conditions and appeal process.There was a widespread shock this Thursday when residents, politicians, and groups opposed to the company’s licence application, received confirmation that the Environmental Protection Agency were allowing the €10m project proceed, subject to a 28-day appeal process.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Claire Keating, a local resident, and spokeswoman with Limerick Against Pollution (LAP),  said she was “shocked” and “extremely disappointed” the decision.Ms Keating said “4,400 objections” were lodged against the plans.“We will be pursuing lots of avenues to stop this. We definitely will be launching an appeal, and we plan on requesting an oral hearing. We are also seeking legal advice, and we have been onto MEPS in Europe too.”“A protest march is planned to take place at City Hall (Limerick) on the 5th of October. We are not going to give up,” Ms Keating explained.The deadline for objections to be submitted against Irish Cement’s proposal is October 15th.Fianna Fáil Councillor James Collins, said it was a “hugely disappointing decision” which he claimed “will damage public health and Limerick’s reputation as a clean, green city”.Cllr Collins said the area where waste will be burned is “adjacent to a public park, four schools”.The EPA’s “Proposed Determination” on Irish Cement’s application “provides for the acceptance of non-hazardous waste materials to be used as alternative fuels and raw materials, up to a maximum of 90,000 tonnes per annum”.The EPA said there were “more than 100 individual conditions relating to the environmental management, operation, control and monitoring of the installation”.It added it was “satisfied that the emissions from the installation when operated in accordance with the conditions of the proposed licence will meet all required environmental protection standards and will not endanger human health or harm the environment in the vicinity of the installation or over a wider area”.Sinn Fein TD, Maurice Quinlivan said he was “appalled”, and added, “this is a toxic decision by the Environmental Protection Agency”.Welcoming the EPA’s decision, a spokesman for Irish Cement the company “will study the details of the proposed licence before making any further comment”.The EPA’s decision follows a decision in April 2018, by An Bord Pleanala to grant permission for the replacement of fossil fuels at Irish Cement’s production plants in Limerick and at Platin, Co Meath, which were both opposed by environmental groups.Limerick City and County Council had initially granted the company permission to go ahead with its plans.Last December Irish Cement pleaded guilty before Limerick District Court in a Prosecutions brought by the EPA, to breaching the terms of its industrial emissions licence at its Limerick plant and received a €4,000 fine.The court heard a thick “glue-like” dust leaked from its production plant, causing damage to nearby homes, cars and gardens.At the time, Irish Cement had three previous convictions for similar breaches of its industrial licence, including two in July, 2018 and one in 2007.center_img Previous articleNew music from Paddy MulcahyNext articleLeon’s Lifeline getting set for Fundraising Demo with Rachel Allen David Raleigh Limerick on Covid watch list Shannon Airport braced for a devastating blow Advertisement TechPost | Episode 9 | Pay with Google, WAZE – the new Google Maps? and Speak don’t Type! Housing 37 Compulsory Purchase Orders issued as council takes action on derelict sites TAGSEnvironmentIrish CementLimerick City and CountyNews RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORlast_img read more