‘Stand up and fight’ to bring Limerick military history to life

first_imgLimerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live TAGSfeaturedFirst World WarGallipoliIrish Naval AssociationlimerickLimerick archivist Jacqui HayesLimerick Branch of the Royal British LegionRoyal Munster FusiliersStand Up and Fight Advertisement Twitter WhatsApp Email Facebook NewsLocal News‘Stand up and fight’ to bring Limerick military history to lifeBy Alan Jacques – April 30, 2015 1677 Vanishing Ireland podcast documenting interviews with people over 70’s, looking for volunteers to share their stories Printcenter_img Linkedin The Royal Munster Fusiliers drumming up recruits in Limerick in 1914.(Photograph by H M Stewart, 104 O’’Connell Street)by Alan [email protected] up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up The Royal Munster Fusiliers drumming up recruits in Limerick in 1914.(Photograph by H M Stewart, 104 O’’Connell Street)FLOWERS sent to a Limerick mother from her son on the front lines of the First World War and an oar from one of the Lusitania’s lifeboats are just two of the rare artefacts that will go on display at City Hall next week.‘Stand Up and Fight’, an exhibition supported by the Limerick Branch of the Royal British Legion, the Royal Munster Fusiliers Association and the Irish Naval Association, will be launched next Thursday, May 7.Never before seen artefacts will be displayed as part of the exhibition of Limerick’s military history from the Wild Geese to Gallipoli.It coincides with the centenary of the Gallipoli campaign that claimed the lives of 800 members of the Royal Munster Fusiliers, 75 of whom were from Limerick including eight men from the village of Coonagh who died when their ship was torpedoed.Conservative estimates suggest that 1,000 of Limerick’s 4,000 listed men died in the First World War.Items on display will include flowers sent from from Ypres by a Limerick soldier to his mother in Limerick; an oar from one of RMS Lusitania’s lifeboats as well as cannonballs and musket balls from the Siege of Limerick.Also included are pikes from the time of the 1798 Rebellion; a bloodied apron worn by a Limerick nurse serving in a First World War field hospital and rare photographs of the American Civil War, Boer War and First World War.“From the departure of the Wild Geese in 1691 to the Limerick men who fought in the Boer Wars, Limerick is steeped in military history,” explained city archivist Jacqui Hayes.“Limerick’s location on the Shannon means it has always been a strategic military stronghold. There were four barracks in Limerick in the nineteenth century and soldiers were a familiar sight.”The ‘Stand Up and Fight’ exhibition will feature memorabilia and militaria from Limerick Museum and Archives’ own collection as well as donations by private collectors and members of the public.Also featured are American Civil War army uniform buttons produced by the Limerick-based Tait Clothing Factory, which held military uniform supply contracts with the Confederacy as well as the British Army during the Crimean War.While much of the exhibition is concerned with the participation of Limerick men and women in The Great War, it also deals with Limerick’s long military and naval tradition as well as the military culture that started in earnest in the 17th century and has lasted since.“While primarily focusing on Limerick’s lengthy military history, the exhibition also examines the impact of the military on Limerick’s social history in these centuries, such as the numbers who joined the armed forces; particular areas which had a tradition of recruitment; family military traditions and the role of women,” Ms Hayes commented.The exhibition looks at some of the careers of Limerick men who fought in the British army all over the world. One of them, George de Lacy Evans from Moig, Askeaton, was involved in the burning of the White House by the British in 1814. He also made a major contribution to army reform by successfully campaigning for an end to flogging in the British army.‘Stand Up and Fight’ runs from May 7 until December at the Glazed Street, Limerick City and County Council Civic Buildings, Merchants Quay. Previous articleAAA join the fight for ‘full equality’ in LimerickNext articleAfghan ‘golden boy’ claims crash ruined his life Alan Jacqueshttp://www.limerickpost.ie RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed livelast_img read more

[COVID-19 Lockdown] Police Should Not Stop Vehicles Carrying Pets, Sick Animals To Vets: Bombay HC

first_imgNews Updates[COVID-19 Lockdown] Police Should Not Stop Vehicles Carrying Pets, Sick Animals To Vets: Bombay HC LIVELAW NEWS NETWORK11 May 2020 6:24 AMShare This – xThe Court also sought clarity from the State Govt on taking pets to walksThe Bombay High Court on Friday directed the State government to pass clear instructions to the police administration not to stop pet taxis or ambulances from ferrying sick animals to and fro from the veterinarian and sought clarity from the State on whether pet owners are allowed to take their dogs/pets for a walk during the current lockdown. Justice SC Gupte was hearing via…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Bombay High Court on Friday directed the State government to pass clear instructions to the police administration not to stop pet taxis or ambulances from ferrying sick animals to and fro from the veterinarian and sought clarity from the State on whether pet owners are allowed to take their dogs/pets for a walk during the current lockdown. Justice SC Gupte was hearing via video conferencing a Public Interest Litigation filed by Vineeta Tandon, an animal welfare activist from Pune who alleged that as a result of the lock-down ordered by the State due to Covid-19 pandemic, police authorities have been arbitrarily stopping citizens from taking their pets, more specifically dogs, for walks. Petitioner’s lawyer Harshwardhan Bhende contended that police stations have issued arbitrary directions to housing societies to stop residents from taking their dogs for walks. It is also submitted that ambulances or pet taxis operated by NGOs and others to ferry animals from their shelters or pet owners to veterinary clinics and back are being arbitrarily stopped and obstructed by the police administration. Even though the Animal Welfare Board of India (AWBI) has issued directions to State DGPs calling upon them to allow people to walk their dogs as a measure of prevention of cruelty to animals, the police administration is refusing to issue passes for these ambulances and pet taxis. The said directive by AWBI has been reported in the press, Bhende submitted. Appearing for the State, AGP PP Kakade submitted that the State’s directive prohibits people from walking their dogs outside compounds of societies or homes and not from walking them within the compounds. As far as ambulances or pet taxis for ferrying of sick animals to and from veterinary clinics are concerned, the State has not asked its police administration to stop or obstruct such ambulances or pet taxis. Thus, Court observed- “If there is any directive issued by the Animal Welfare Board of India to the State DGPs in the matter of walking of dogs, the State must take an appropriate decision on that behalf and communicate the same to the court by this next date. In the meantime, the State is directed to issue a clear directive to the police administration not to stop or obstruct ambulances or pet taxis for ferrying sick animals to and from veterinary clinics.” So far as walking of dogs and petering to their needs through animal feeders are concerned, the State was directed to communicate its stand through an affidavit by the next date. The next date of hearing is May 15, 2020.Last month, the Kerala HC had allowed a writ petition filed by a person seeking vehicle pass to buy pet feed for his cats amid lockdown.While allowing the plea, the HC observed that choice to rear pets was traceable to fundamental right to privacy under Article 21 of the Constitution. Download order Read Order Next Storylast_img read more