‘Stand up and fight’ to bring Limerick military history to life

first_imgLimerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live TAGSfeaturedFirst World WarGallipoliIrish Naval AssociationlimerickLimerick archivist Jacqui HayesLimerick Branch of the Royal British LegionRoyal Munster FusiliersStand Up and Fight Advertisement Twitter WhatsApp Email Facebook NewsLocal News‘Stand up and fight’ to bring Limerick military history to lifeBy Alan Jacques – April 30, 2015 1677 Vanishing Ireland podcast documenting interviews with people over 70’s, looking for volunteers to share their stories Printcenter_img Linkedin The Royal Munster Fusiliers drumming up recruits in Limerick in 1914.(Photograph by H M Stewart, 104 O’’Connell Street)by Alan [email protected] up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up The Royal Munster Fusiliers drumming up recruits in Limerick in 1914.(Photograph by H M Stewart, 104 O’’Connell Street)FLOWERS sent to a Limerick mother from her son on the front lines of the First World War and an oar from one of the Lusitania’s lifeboats are just two of the rare artefacts that will go on display at City Hall next week.‘Stand Up and Fight’, an exhibition supported by the Limerick Branch of the Royal British Legion, the Royal Munster Fusiliers Association and the Irish Naval Association, will be launched next Thursday, May 7.Never before seen artefacts will be displayed as part of the exhibition of Limerick’s military history from the Wild Geese to Gallipoli.It coincides with the centenary of the Gallipoli campaign that claimed the lives of 800 members of the Royal Munster Fusiliers, 75 of whom were from Limerick including eight men from the village of Coonagh who died when their ship was torpedoed.Conservative estimates suggest that 1,000 of Limerick’s 4,000 listed men died in the First World War.Items on display will include flowers sent from from Ypres by a Limerick soldier to his mother in Limerick; an oar from one of RMS Lusitania’s lifeboats as well as cannonballs and musket balls from the Siege of Limerick.Also included are pikes from the time of the 1798 Rebellion; a bloodied apron worn by a Limerick nurse serving in a First World War field hospital and rare photographs of the American Civil War, Boer War and First World War.“From the departure of the Wild Geese in 1691 to the Limerick men who fought in the Boer Wars, Limerick is steeped in military history,” explained city archivist Jacqui Hayes.“Limerick’s location on the Shannon means it has always been a strategic military stronghold. There were four barracks in Limerick in the nineteenth century and soldiers were a familiar sight.”The ‘Stand Up and Fight’ exhibition will feature memorabilia and militaria from Limerick Museum and Archives’ own collection as well as donations by private collectors and members of the public.Also featured are American Civil War army uniform buttons produced by the Limerick-based Tait Clothing Factory, which held military uniform supply contracts with the Confederacy as well as the British Army during the Crimean War.While much of the exhibition is concerned with the participation of Limerick men and women in The Great War, it also deals with Limerick’s long military and naval tradition as well as the military culture that started in earnest in the 17th century and has lasted since.“While primarily focusing on Limerick’s lengthy military history, the exhibition also examines the impact of the military on Limerick’s social history in these centuries, such as the numbers who joined the armed forces; particular areas which had a tradition of recruitment; family military traditions and the role of women,” Ms Hayes commented.The exhibition looks at some of the careers of Limerick men who fought in the British army all over the world. One of them, George de Lacy Evans from Moig, Askeaton, was involved in the burning of the White House by the British in 1814. He also made a major contribution to army reform by successfully campaigning for an end to flogging in the British army.‘Stand Up and Fight’ runs from May 7 until December at the Glazed Street, Limerick City and County Council Civic Buildings, Merchants Quay. Previous articleAAA join the fight for ‘full equality’ in LimerickNext articleAfghan ‘golden boy’ claims crash ruined his life Alan Jacqueshttp://www.limerickpost.ie RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed livelast_img read more

Zuckert earns achievement award

first_imgPolitical science professor Michael Zuckert recently won the Jack Miller Center Chairman’s Lifetime Achievement Award for his extensive work in political theory. The award recognized Zuckert for his outstanding scholarship and his work as a classroom teacher. Zuckert provided generations of students with a profound knowledge of American constitutional heritage, according to a statement released by the prize committee. Zuckert said he feels privileged to join the illustrious ranks of past recipients. “My predecessors in this award are very distinguished people, and I’m proud to be in their company,” he said. Zuckert said he didn’t know he would receive the award until a colleague surprised him with the news the day it was given. “I didn’t actually find out I was getting the award until the day it was supposed to be handed out,” Zuckert said. “Somebody slipped the news to me at lunch on accident.” In addition to writing and teaching in his main fields of political theory and constitutional studies, Zuckert organized a new constitutional studies field that will begin next semester. He also edits the journal ‘American Political Thought.’ Zuckert said the responsibility that came with editing the journal played a key role in receiving the award. “The award is definitely in some degree for me editing that journal, which makes contributions to the understanding of the American political tradition,” Zuckert said. Zuckert said it was ultimately his college experience at Cornell University that motivated him to pursue a career in political science. He said he was influenced by the quality of his teachers and the political climate of the time. “I was in college in the ‘60s when there were a lot of exciting things going on politically, and I was also fortunate enough to go to a college where we had really good faculty in political science,” Zuckert said. “They reinforced my interest in the subject.” Aside from making the new constitutional studies field a success, Zuckert said his other major goal at the moment is to finish a trilogy of books on constitutional theory spanning ancient Greece to the modern era. “I’ve been working on it for a long time, and at this point I just want to get it off my desk,” he said. The opportunity to teach and interact with students on a daily basis is the most rewarding part of his job, Zuckert said. “I very much like working with the students here,” he said. “That would be my number one thing.” Ultimately, Zeckert said he is grateful for the assistance and the opportunities Notre Dame has provided him over the course of his career at the University. “The administration has been extremely helpful in facilitating the work that I’m trying to do,” he said. “This is a university that I think is committed to keeping alive the tradition of political theory and making sure it thrives, and I think they’ve done a great job of supporting us.”last_img read more

Wimbledon cancelled for the first time since World War Two

first_img…“The 134th Championships will instead be staged from June 28 to July 11, 2021.” LONDON (Reuters) – The Wimbledon championships were cancelled for the first time since World War Two on Wednesday as the coronavirus pandemic struck another blue-riband sports event off the calendar and wiped out the entire tennis grasscourt season.While the decision had looked inevitable for some time, since the virtual shutdown of world sport and the postponement of the Tokyo Olympics, Wimbledon had been one of the few events not to have been officially cancelled or postponed.But after emergency talks between the various stakeholders over the last few days, the All England Lawn Tennis Club (AELTC) announced that it was impossible for the grasscourt Grand Slam, scheduled for June 29-July 12, to take place. “It is with great regret that the main board … have today decided that The Championships 2020 will be cancelled due to public health concerns linked to the coronavirus epidemic,” the AELTC said in a statement here“The 134th Championships will instead be staged from June 28 to July 11, 2021.” Following the cancellation of the grasscourt major, and with the pandemic worsening in Europe and the U.S, the men’s ATP Tour, women’s WTA Tour and the International Tennis Federation extended the suspension of professional tennis for another five weeks to July 13.“At this time, tournaments taking place from July 13, 2020 onwards are still planning to proceed as per the published schedule,” said a joint statement from the governing bodies.Britain’s death toll from the virus reached 2,352 on Wednesday, according to NHS figures.The French Open, originally due to be held from May 24-June 7 was postponed and controversially rescheduled by the French tennis federation for Sept. 20-Oct. 4, shortly after the end of the U.S. Open.The U.S. Open organisers said they were continuing with their plans to host the hardcourt Grand Slam in New York as scheduled from Aug 31-Sep 14.NO VACCINE = NO TENNIS Players across the tennis fraternity reacted with shock and sadness at the cancellation of Wimbledon.Roger Federer, whose record haul of 20 Grand Slam titles includes eight Wimbledon trophies, said he was “devastated”. “There is no gif for these things that I am feeling,” he added. In a statement from the organisers of the Halle Open, which was also cancelled, Federer said: “We are going through difficult times but we will emerge stronger. I already look forward to returning to Halle next year. Stay healthy.”Former Wimbledon champion Amelie Mauresmo did not think either the U.S. Open or the French Open would go ahead this year. “I think we’re going to have to draw a line under the 2020 tennis season,” Mauresmo said on Twitter this week.“International circuit = players of all nationalities plus management, spectators and people from the 4 corners of the world who bring these events to life. No vaccine = no tennis.” Unlike the French Open which is played on clay, Wimbledon’s scope for re-arranging the start date was extremely limited.While Centre Court and Court One boast a roof, playing elite level tennis outside on grass would have been extremely challenging in late summer or autumn with a lack of light and problems caused by dew forming on the surface late in the day.Shortening the format of the tournament, or playing behind closed doors, would also have proved extremely unpopular with the players. “While in some ways this has been a challenging decision, we strongly believe it is not only in the best interests of society at this time, but also provides certainty to our colleagues in international tennis given the impact on the grass court events in the UK and in Europe and the broader tennis calendar,” AELTC Chief Executive Richard Lewis said.Tickets holders will be offered the chance to purchase tickets for the same day and court for 2021 championships as well as being issued with a refund for this year’s event, organisers added. Wimbledon had been held every year since 1946 after a six-year hiatus because the country was at war.last_img read more

A Malachi Richardson impostor spent a day fooling everybody: ‘I got catfished in person’

first_imgIn every way it was Malachi Richardson, except it wasn’t. The two pierced ears. A somewhat scraggly high-top fade haircut. The “Always Reppin’” shirt with the orange block “S” that Syracuse wore during warmups in the NCAA Tournament. And a face that, for someone not entirely familiar with the looks of the former Syracuse standout, could easily be mistaken for Richardson’s.For all intents and purposes, he’ll be referred to as the impostor. He rode a commercial flight early Saturday morning from Syracuse’s Hancock International Airport to Newark Liberty International Airport, where he stopped for pictures, videos and autographs before hopping on a plane to Florida. Two 20-year-olds from central New York, Dustin DuBrule and Sean Loveless, rode both flights with the impostor and fell victim to his charade. DuBrule posted his photo with the impostor shortly after 11 a.m. on Saturday, but it didn’t start circulating until late Sunday night, when Loveless tweeted at Richardson to clarify that he had in fact been duped the day before.“A normal person would be like, ‘It’s not me, but thanks,’ or just says, like, ‘I look like him,’” Loveless said. “I am pissed off … I just have a random picture with somebody who I don’t know who he is.”The impostor still remains nameless as of late Sunday night to the two 20-year-olds, most likely along with everyone else fooled throughout the day on Saturday.And while the real Malachi Richardson could see his name grow in popularity over the next month, another Malachi Richardson could be reveling in the humor of his stunt somewhere in Florida’s warm summer while remaining a mystery.“I got catfished in person,” Loveless said. “Like who gets catfished in person? And then I did.” Comments Related Stories Malachi Richardson reportedly signs with agent, officially ending his college careerHow Michael Gbinije and Malachi Richardson fared at the NBA Draft Combine on Thursday Malachi Richardson was on my plane tho pic.twitter.com/uqdGSCgotK— Dustin DuBrule (@DustinDuBrule) May 21, 2016AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe impostor signed DuBrule’s basketball and told him that he didn’t care which NBA team selected him in the upcoming draft, just that he wanted to be taken. He posed for a picture with Loveless, who waited to approach the impostor until the crowd of around 10 people surrounding him in the tunnel leading from the plane to the gate dissipated.  He even obliged to the request of a stewardess on the first flight, who asked that the impostor send a message to her son in a video.“He really woke up in the morning like, ‘I’m trying to be Malachi Richardson today,’” DuBrule said in a phone interview Sunday night. Published on May 23, 2016 at 2:06 am Contact Matt: [email protected] | @matt_schneidman When the impostor boarded the flight from Syracuse to Newark around 5 a.m. on Saturday, passengers mumbled amongst each other that a recognizable face had joined them. Loveless resisted the urge to approach him immediately and like other passengers on the flight, waited until the plane landed in New Jersey around 7 a.m. to ask for favors.After the impostor’s fellow passengers finished crowding around him, other bystanders in the airport began flocking toward the Richardson lookalike. He never swayed from character, even taking a video with a mom and her son while advising the son to stay in school.Richardson, of course, didn’t heed the impostor’s advice and will instead hope to hear his name called in the first round of this year’s NBA Draft after foregoing his final three years of eligibility at SU.That, in part, is what made the actual Malachi Richardson’s presence on the flight more believable.“He’s still the type of person where he’s humble because he doesn’t have all that money to own his own jet yet and he still has to drive and fly commercial,” Loveless said.This wasn’t an isolated instance where a well-known figure’s doppelganger jokes around with one person and pretends to be someone more famous than themselves. This was intentional, effectively scripted from head to toe, fooling masses of people in Richardson’s own home state about an hour’s car ride from his hometown of Trenton, New Jersey. Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more