Chelsea boss Frank Lampard speaks out over Willian’s future amid Arsenal transfer links

first_img Matches returning with halves shorter than 45 minutes ‘not ruled out’To view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video Play VideoLoaded: 0%0:00Progress: 0%PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration Time 1:39FullscreenMatches returning with halves shorter than 45 minutes ‘not ruled out’https://metro.co.uk/video/matches-returning-halves-shorter-45-minutes-not-ruled-out-2165468/This is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.The likes of Tammy Abraham, Danny Rose and Troy Deeney have all raised concerns about the English top flight restarting amid the pandemic and Lampard says he understands their reservations. ‘Everyone will handle those situations differently,’ the Chelsea manager added.‘People like Troy Deeney, you have to give the freedom to speak out, because people will be speaking from the heart.‘I think we have to upgrade that communication so players know what they’re going through, and then they can make those decisions.’Follow Metro Sport across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. For more stories like this, check our sport page.MORE: Frank Lampard’s transfer stance on Miralem Pjanic and Jorginho as Juventus offer Chelsea swap dealMORE: BBC set to show live Premier League matches for first time ever with selection of games to be made free-to-air Advertisement Frank Lampard says he wants the same Chelsea squad until the end of the season (Picture: Getty)Chelsea head coach Frank Lampard has confirmed that he is keen to extend Willian’s contract if the Premier League campaign restarts. Willian becomes a free agent at the end of next month and discussions over a possible extension at Stamford Bridge have reached an impasse amid the coronavirus crisis. The 31-year-old Brazil international is demanding a new two-year contract but Chelsea are only willing to offer him a rolling 12-month extension and widespread reports suggest he is set to leave the club. Comment Willian and Lampard were once team-mates at Chelsea (Picture: Getty)‘Of course they’ll be concerned about themselves, in terms of how training is now is and if the pre-season is a rush they’re going to have to make sure they’re alright.‘So it’s going to have to be something we have to look at, hopefully we can make that arrangement can be made so they can stay with us.‘I would love the squad to look as it has all season, but we’ll have to see how that works.’ Giroud and Willian are both out of contract next month (Picture: Getty)Both Arsenal and Tottenham have been mooted as potential suitors, with Willian hoping to remain in London, but Lampard has played down the speculation by declaring that he wants the same squad until the end of the season if ‘Project Restart’ is successful. AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENTOlivier Giroud is also nearing the end of his deal with the Blues.Uncertainty over player contracts remains a huge concern among clubs if the 2019/20 campaign resumes at some stage, with teams potentially set to lose squad members whose deals expire in June.‘It is still uncertain if and when play will get underway. We have big players [out of contract] so that’s something I’m obviously looking at very carefully,’ Lampard told Sky Sports. ‘The ones who are out of contract here have been great servants for the club, and actually have a lot of feeling for the club. Metro Sport ReporterSaturday 16 May 2020 8:01 amShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link6.1kShares Chelsea boss Frank Lampard speaks out over Willian’s future amid Arsenal transfer links Advertisementlast_img read more

Study suggests rural students lacking career guidance in school

first_imgStatewide—About one-in-four public school students in Indiana attends a rural school, and new research suggests they need more assistance in career development.A paper co-authored by Diana Quintero, a research analyst with the Brown Center on Education Policy, finds that while rural students are more likely to graduate high school than those in urban areas, rural students have lower college enrollment rates.Quintero says one factor is that 14% of schools in rural areas do not have access to a school counselor, who can provide information to students about career or post-secondary academic options. She says limited budgets of rural schools make it difficult for counselors to focus solely on advising students.“They spend less time on career guidance and more time on administrative tasks,” she points out, “because they’re isolated, lots of rural schools can share a school counselor. They have to go from two different places. That makes a challenge.”Quintero says research found the presence of one additional counselor in a school was associated with an increase of 10 percentage points in four-year college enrollment.Indiana’s student-to-counselor ratio averaged 541-to-one between 2004 and 2015, more than double the American School Counselor Association recommendation of 250 students per school counselor. The research calls for additional funding to allow rural schools to hire more full-time and experienced counselors.Quintero says rural communities also could leverage the resources and knowledge of their own residents. “Rural students are very close to their communities and they have tight connections so they might go for college and come back and help their communities,” she states. “They could provide guidance to rural students by going to high schools.”The research also encourages the development of community partnerships, including churches, public social service agencies, and other organizations that can assist students with college applications, financial aid documents, and scholarship information.Indiana has the eighth-highest population of rural students in the U.S.last_img read more