First Nation basketball tournament bans player because of bloodlines

first_imgAPTN National NewsA First Nation basketball tournament in British Columbia is being criticized for not allowing a player to compete.It has nothing to do with his age or team.Josiah Wilson was born in Haiti and adopted by a First Nations family.Chris Stewart brings us his story. cstewart@aptn.calast_img

A look at the Muskrat Falls boondoggle in pictures

first_imgAPTN News When announced in 2012, former premier Kathy Dunderdale said the Muskrat Falls hydroelectric dam proposal was the most scrutinized project in the province’s history – but some Labradorians say the project is unsafe – along with construction issues, Muskrat Falls has also faced protests and hunger strikes.Here is a look at the project in pictures. Billions and counting – the original cost of the Muskrat Falls hydroelectric project was $6-billion- it is now sitting at $12.7 billion. People protesting the Muskrat Falls hydroelectric project call themselves Land Protectors. The protests at the site start in 2012 and become a regular event in 2016. The response from officials to the growing protests is to set up what they call a protest pad or safe zone across the road from the main gate at Muskrat Falls. Labrador Land Protectors decided to call it the Peace Camp. RCMP move in on Land Protectors in the early morning hours of Oct. 17, 2016. Police claim the Land Protectors refused to remain across the road from the Muskrat Falls construction site entrance. According to people at the site, eight demonstrators are arrested. People who live downstream from Muskrat Falls are worried about two things; Methylmercury produced when foliage and water mix, and what some believe is the unstable clay soil underneath the dam’s North Spur. In October 2016, Jerry Kohlmeister, left, Delilah Saunders, and Billy Gauthier go on a hunger strike to force the provincial government to study environmental issues related to Muskrat Falls. Gauthier says he went without food for 13 days. Nalcor wins an injunction against Land Protectors in October 2016. The Land Protectors are ordered to stay away from the entrance to the Muskrat Falls construction site. After the injunction is announced, more than two dozen Land Protectors break through the gates at the construction site and occupy Nalcor’s offices. After the occupation ends, 18 men and 10 women faced a total of 60 charges that include disobeying a court order and taking a motor vehicle without consent. In June 2017, Inuk Grandmother Beatrice Hunter is in court facing charges from the Nalcor occupation. She tells a judge that she will not comply with his order to stay away from the construction site. Hunter spends 11 days in Her Majesty’s Penitentiary in St. John’s, a thousand kilometres south of her home in Labrador. A month later, Marjorie Flowers is incarcerated in St. John’s for also telling a judge that she will not comply with his order to stay clear of the Muskrat Falls site. The Independent Expert Advisory Committee (IEAC) was set up as a result of the hunger strike. It is to come up with a plan to deal with methylmercury at Muskrat Falls. Workers started collecting samples for testing. (Photo courtesy Prentiss Balcom) Nalcor admits that methylmercury will be more prevalent than first reported. The company said it will monitor the level of toxins downstream and warn people downstream to reduce their intake of fish and wildlife if necessary. (Photo courtesy Prentiss Balcom) In July 2017, seven massive generators were shipped from the south to the Muskrat Falls site. Jim Learning, an Inuk Elder, faces civil charges for breaking the court injunction. He was jailed when he refused to promise a Supreme Court judge that he would follow the injunction. After several days in jail, he still refused to sign an undertaking to stay away from Muskrat Falls. He was willing to go back to jail but was placed on house arrest instead. In August, Cole and a group of Land Protectors crash a meeting in Happy Valley-Goose Bay where Indigenous Affairs Minister Carolyn Bennett and Liberal Labrador MP Yvonne Jones were talking with constituents. A month later, Cole and the Land Protectors travel to St. John’s, NL and rally outside Nalcor headquarters. Cole wants a meeting with Nalcor CEO Stan Marshall – instead, police are called. Marshall later agrees to participate in a sharing circle that will take place on Nov. 29. On November 20, 2017, Newfoundland and Labrador Premier Dwight Ball calls an inquiry into the Muskrat Falls project. The terms of reference will look at the economic side of the project. Justice Richard Leblanc will start in January. Land Protectors say the inquiry will do nothing to protect them from flooding, and methylmercury poisoning. According Ball, the Muskrat Falls generating station is 85 per cent complete and is scheduled to start producing 834 megawatts of electricity in 2020. At the moment, it is two years behind schedule. Because of the ballooning costs of the project, it is expected that Newfoundlanders and Labradorians will pay more for hydro rates in the coming years. <>last_img read more

Inquiry into murdered Indigenous women loses bid for two disputed RCMP files

first_imgInquiry commissioners Qajaq Robinson and Brian Eyolfson. (APTN)The Canadian PressThe National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls has lost a court bid for access to two RCMP files the Mounties refuse to hand over.The RCMP gave the inquiry more than 100 files but concluded that disclosing the two disputed ones could compromise ongoing investigations.The Mounties then filed certificates with the Federal Court under the Canada Evidence Act, which allows for a hearing to decide whether secrecy will prevail.In its ruling, the court sides with the RCMP, saying it is satisfied the refusal to hand over the files was not because of a fear of embarrassment or revelation of misconduct by force members.The inquiry recently delivered its final report calling for fundamental changes in the areas of health, security, justice and culture affecting Indigenous women and girls.The inquiry’s mandate expires at the end of the month, and there was no immediate word on whether it would appeal the Federal Court ruling.last_img read more

Bombardier workers to stage rally in Toronto over Boeing dispute will walk

first_imgTORONTO – The union representing Bombardier’s production workers says employees at the company’s aerospace plant in Toronto will walk out Wednesday — a move meant to pressure Boeing to drop a trade complaint against Bombardier.Unifor national president Jerry Dias said in a statement that the rally is intended to give workers a voice during the ongoing dispute between the two companies.He said Bombardier workers “are well aware that Boeing has no case, and that workers will end up paying the price as corporations fight this out.”Boeing has filed a trade complaint accusing Bombardier of selling its C-Series passenger jets to a U.S. airline at an unfairly low price with help from government subsidies.The U.S. Department of Commerce will release the preliminary results of its investigation next week, and a finding against Bombardier could result in fines or tariffs.Last week, Dias and Boeing officials met in Washington, D.C., where Dias encouraged Boeing to drop the complaint and seek a resolution with Bombardier.Note to readers: CORRECTS name of regulatory bodieslast_img read more

Trumps budget balloons deficits cuts social safety net

first_imgWASHINGTON – President Donald Trump unveiled a $4.4 trillion budget plan Monday that envisions steep cuts to America’s social safety net but mounting spending on the military, formally retreating from last year’s promises to balance the federal budget.The president’s spending outline for the first time acknowledges that the Republican tax overhaul passed last year would add billions to the deficit and not “pay for itself” as Trump and his Republican allies asserted. If enacted as proposed, though no presidential budget ever is, the plan would establish an era of $1 trillion-plus yearly deficits.The open embrace of red ink is a remarkable public reversal for Trump and his party, which spent years objecting to President Barack Obama’s increased spending during the depths of the Great Recession. Rhetoric aside, however, Trump’s pattern is in line with past Republican presidents who have overseen spikes in deficits as they simultaneously increased military spending and cut taxes.“We’re going to have the strongest military we’ve ever had, by far,” Trump said in an Oval Office appearance Monday. “In this budget we took care of the military like it’s never been taken care of before.”Trump’s budget revived his calls for big cuts to domestic programs that benefit the poor and middle class, such as food stamps, housing subsidies and student loans. Retirement benefits would remain mostly untouched by Trump’s plan, as he has pledged, though Medicare providers would absorb about $500 billion in cuts — a nearly 6 per cent reduction. Some beneficiaries in Social Security’s disability program would have to re-enter the workforce under proposed changes to eligibility rules.While all presidents’ budgets are essentially dead on arrival — Congress writes and enacts its own spending legislation — Trump’s plan was dead before it landed. It came just three days after the president signed a bipartisan agreement that set broad parameters for spending over the next two years. That deal, which includes large increases for domestic programs, rendered Monday’s Trump plan for 10-year, $1.7 trillion cuts to domestic agencies such as the departments of Health and Human Services, Agriculture and Housing and Urban Development even more unrealistic.The White House used Monday’s event to promote its long-awaited plan to increase funding for infrastructure. The plan would put up $200 billion in federal money over the next 10 years in hopes of leveraging a total of $1.5 trillion in infrastructure spending, relying on state and local governments and the private sector to contribute the bulk of the funding.But after his aides talked up that plan over the weekend, Trump suggested that his infrastructure proposal wasn’t a big deal for him.“If for any reason, they don’t want to support to it, hey, that’s going to be up to them,” he said of the Republican-controlled Congress. “What was very important to me was the military; what was very important to me was the tax cuts.”Trump also is proposing work requirements for several federal programs, including housing subsidies, food stamps and Medicaid. Such ideas have backing from powerful figures in Congress including Republican House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wisconsin, who promises action on a “workforce development” agenda this year.There was immediate opposition from Democrats.“The Trump budget proposal makes clear his desire to enact massive cuts to health care, anti-poverty programs and investments in economic growth to blunt the deficit-exploding impact of his tax cuts for millionaires and corporations,” said Rep. John Yarmuth of Kentucky, the top Democrat on the House Budget Committee.Some Republicans, on the other hand, said spending was much too high.“This budget continues too much of Washington’s wasteful spending — it does not balance in ten years, and it creates a deficit of over a trillion dollars next year,” said Rep. Matt Gaetz of Florida. “We cannot steal from America’s future to pay for spending todayTrump’s plan aims at other familiar targets. It would eliminate the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, the National Endowment for the Arts and National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Institute of Museum and Library Services. The administration wants NASA out of the International Space Station by 2025 and private businesses running the place instead.But the domestic cuts would be far from enough to make up for the plummeting tax revenue projected in the budget.Trump’s plan sees a 2019 deficit of $984 billion, though White House Budget Director Mick Mulvaney admits $1.2 trillion is more plausible after last week’s congressional budget pact and $90 billion worth of disaster aid is tacked on. That would be more than double the 2019 deficit the administration promised last year.All told, the new budget sees accumulating deficits of $7.2 trillion over the coming decade; Trump’s plan last year projected a 10-year shortfall of $3.2 trillion. And that’s assuming Trump’s rosy economic predictions come true and Congress follows through — in an election year — with politically toxic cuts to social programs, farm subsidies and Medicare providers.Last year Trump’s budget promised such ideas could generate a small budget surplus by 2027; now, his best-case scenario is for a $450 billion deficit that year, more than $300 billion of which can be traced to his December tax cut.In stark numbers, the budget rewrites the administration’s talking points for last year’s tax plan, which administration figures such as Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin promised would more than pay for itself.“Not only will this tax plan pay for itself, but it will pay down debt,” Mnuchin declared in September.Instead, Trump’s budget projects that tax revenues will plummet by $3.7 trillion over the 2018-27 decade relative to last year’s “baseline” estimates.The budget also includes $1.6 billion for the second stage of Trump’s proposed border wall, a 65-mile segment in Texas’ Rio Grande Valley. Trump’s request last year for 74 miles of wall in San Diego and the Rio Grande Valley is pending before lawmakers right now.Once again, there’s no mention of how Mexico would have to pay for it, as Trump repeatedly promised during the presidential campaign and after his victory.The plan reprises proposals to curb crop insurance costs, cut student loan subsidies and reduce pension benefits for federal workers. They went nowhere last year.Trump’s plan promises 3 per cent growth for the nation’s economy, continuing low inflation and low interest yields on U.S. Treasury bills despite a flood of new borrowing. That likely underestimates the mounting cost of financing the government’s $20 trillion-plus debt, many economists say.Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody’s Analytics, said a surge in stimulus from higher government spending and tax cuts would boost growth but for only for a short time.“This will meaningfully raise the odds that after juiced-up growth in 2018 and 2019, we will get a much weaker economy, possibly a recession in the next decade,” Zandi said. “In good times, budget policy should be working to get the deficits down because bad times are sure to come.”last_img read more

Tim Hortons franchisee sues parent company for 4M over licence renewal

first_imgA Tim Hortons franchisee filed a $4-million lawsuit against the coffee-and-doughnut chain’s parent company after he says it refused to renew a licence for one of his stores in bad faith.“The actions of the defendant were callous, wanton and in total disregard of the rights of the plaintiff,” reads a lawsuit Mark Kuziora filed in the Ontario Superior Court against TDL Group Corp., a subsidiary of parent company Restaurant Brands International.Kuziora, an outspoken member of a dissident Tim Hortons’ franchisee group, owns two locations in Toronto. The lease for his store at 200 Bay Street expires Aug. 31.He says he was told in early April that he would be denied the renewal after months of negotiations.Kuziora belongs to the Great White North Franchisee Association, a group that claims to represent about half of Canada’s Tim Hortons franchisees and formed to voice the franchisees’ concerns.He is also the lead plaintiff in a class-action lawsuit filed by the GWNFA alleging RBI improperly used money from a national advertising fund, funnelling nearly $700 million earmarked for advertising, marketing and sales promotions to itself and TDL. RBI has denied the allegations, which have not been proven in court.The GWNFA and Tims have also recently sparred over a $700-million renovation plan to bring a more natural look and open-concept seating to Tim Hortons locations. GWNFA said the plans — which asked franchisees to kick in $450,000 each for renovations — were “ill-conceived.”Last spring, RBI started discussing future renovations of the Bay Street store with Kuziora, according to the lawsuit, and confirmed its established practice of “granting 100 per cent of term renewals for franchisees prepared to undertake renovations would be followed.”Kuziora committed to the renovations with the understanding the company would renew his lease, according to the suit filed last month.On March 27, Greg Hiltz, the area franchise lead for central Canada, informed Kuziora it would not happen, despite previously confirming the company had no plans to deviate from its standard practice.Tim Hortons Canada president Sami Siddiqui wrote in an email that the company stands by its decision.“The process of entering into a new franchisee licence is never automatic,” he said, adding it’s subject to a detailed business review, which was done and led to the decision.The lawsuit claims RBI decided to reject the renewal in bad faith based on Kuziora’s tense relationship with management.RBI and the GWNFA have been embroiled in a public battle since the group formed more than a year ago, with the parent company largely choosing to ignore the association aside from specific remarks and filing legal action against them.Tim Hortons president Alex Macedo recently admitted the company could have handled things better and said he’s spoken to GWNFA members on a cross-country tour of visits with franchisees aimed at repairing the relationship.Siddiqui said that Kuziora’s second location remains open and the company “will continue to help him be a successful operator.”The company declined to answer whether it had filed a statement of defence. None of the allegations have been proven in court.Follow @AleksSagan on Twitter.Companies in this story: (TSX: QSR)last_img read more

Resolute Forest Products thirdquarter profit up paying special dividend

first_imgMONTREAL – Resolute Forest Products Inc. announced it would pay a special dividend as it reported a third-quarter profit of US$117 million, up from $24 million a year ago.The company, which keeps its books in U.S. dollars, says it will make a special payment of $1.50 per share to shareholders of record on Dec. 6.Resolute’s third-quarter profit amounted to $1.25 per diluted share, up from 26 cents per diluted share a year ago.Sales totalled $974 million in the quarter, up from $885 million in the third quarter of 2017.Excluding special items, Resolute says it earned $96 million or $1.03 per share for the quarter, up from $31 million or 34 cents per share a year ago.Analysts on average had expected a profit of 71 cents per share, according to Thomson Reuters Eikon.Companies in this story: (TSX:RFP)last_img read more

Unilever agrees to buy GSK business in India

first_imgLONDON — Unilever has agreed to buy GlaxoSmithKline’s health food drinks business in India and Bangladesh, including popular Horlicks brand products, for 3.3 billion euros ($3.8 billion).The purchase expands the company’s footprint in rapidly growing emerging markets.Unilever says the deal includes the merger of its local unit with GSK Consumer Healthcare India and the purchase of GSK Bangladesh Ltd. The takeover is expected to be completed within 12 months.Nitin Paranjpe, president of Unilever’s food and refreshment unit, says the transaction will give the company brands with “leading market positions … in one of the world’s most exciting and fast-growing markets.”GSK CEO Emma Walmsley says proceeds will be used to support the group’s strategic priorities, “including investing in our pharmaceutical business.”The Associated Presslast_img read more

The Latest Apple to appeal iPhone ruling in China

first_imgNEW YORK — The Latest on Apple-Qualcomm dispute (all times local):1:55 p.m.Apple says it’s appealing a Chinese court ruling that would ban some iPhones in China as part of a long-running patent dispute with chipmaker Qualcomm.Apple said it filed a request Monday for the court to reconsider its ruling.Qualcomm had announced earlier Monday that the Fuzhou Intermediate People’s Court has granted preliminary injunctions ordering four Chinese subsidiaries of Apple to stop selling and importing iPhones.It’s not immediately clear what the full scope of the ruling is. While Qualcomm says the ban covers iPhones 6S through X, Apple says all iPhone models remain available for customers in China.The dispute is over two Qualcomm patents enabling consumers to format photos and manage phone apps using a touch screen. Apple calls it a “desperate move” by San Diego-based Qualcomm.___12:20 p.m.U.S. chipmaker Qualcomm says it’s won an order in a Chinese court banning some Apple phones in China as part of a long-running dispute over patents.Qualcomm said Monday that the Fuzhou Intermediate People’s Court in China has granted preliminary injunctions ordering four Chinese subsidiaries of Apple to stop selling and importing iPhones.It’s not immediately clear what the full scope of the ruling is. While Qualcomm says the ban covers iPhones 6S through X, Apple says all iPhone models remain available for customers in China.The dispute is over two Qualcomm patents enabling consumers to format photos and manage phone apps using a touch screen. Apple says it will fight Qualcomm’s “desperate move” in the courts.Apple and Qualcomm also have cases in the U.S. and the U.K.The Associated Presslast_img read more

Five things to watch for in the Canadian business world in the

first_imgTORONTO — Five things to watch for in the Canadian business world in the coming week:Home salesThe Canadian Real Estate Association is expected to release its monthly home sales figures for November on Monday. The reading comes after home sales fell for a second month in a row in October.Inflation numbersStatistics Canada will release its consumer price index for November on Wednesday. The country’s annual inflation rate picked up its pace in September to hit 2.4 per cent in an advance mostly fuelled by temporary factors like higher gasoline prices and steeper airfares.BlackBerry resultsBlackBerry will release its third-quarter financial results on Thursday. The Waterloo, Ont.-based technology company announced last week that it has built a new service to provide infrastructure for vehicles and traffic lights to exchange information securely.Latest GDP numbersStatistics Canada will release gross domestic product by industry, retail trade and investment in building construction figures for October on Friday. Canada’s GDP edged down 0.1 per cent in September, the first move lower after seven consecutive months of growth.BoC surveyBank of Canada releases its latest business outlook survey and senior loan officer survey on Friday. The central bank’s previous survey suggested companies are optimistic about the year ahead — especially when it comes to sales growth, foreign demand and their investment plans. The Canadian Presslast_img read more

Markets Right Now Stocks open lower on Wall Street

first_imgNEW YORK — The latest on developments in financial markets (all times local):9:35 a.m.Stocks are opening lower on Wall Street a day after the market took a big plunge.Health care companies and consumer products makers had some of the biggest losses in early trading Thursday.UnitedHealth Group, the largest health insurer in the country, fell 1.8 per cent. Procter & Gamble lost 1.3 per cent.Walgreens fell 2.8 per cent and Conagra, a giant food maker, fell 7.4 per cent. Both companies reported weaker sales than analysts were expecting.The S&P 500 index lost 14 points, or 0.6 per cent, to 2,491.The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 118 points, or 0.5 per cent, to 23,191. The tech-heavy Nasdaq composite slipped 27 points, or 0.4 per cent, to 6,611.Bond prices rose, sending yields lower.The Associated Presslast_img read more

Ford and Cadillac SUVs Toyota sports car star at auto show

first_imgDETROIT — SUVs and a big pickup truck will get top billing at Detroit’s auto show this year, but there are some surprise sports cars and electric vehicles on the agenda.Press days for the show begin Monday, although there are a couple of unveils set for before the show startsThe most popular vehicle of the bunch is the Ford Explorer, revealed ahead of the show Wednesday night at Ford Field, the home of the National Football League’s Detroit Lions.Cadillac will show off its XT6, a smaller-than-a-truck, three-row family hauler at an event Sunday night. Toyota brings back the high-performance Supra on Monday. The sports car developed a cult following when it was on the market from 1978 to 2002. Nissan and its Infiniti luxury brand plan to show two concept electric vehicles on Monday as well.This year’s North American International Auto Show will take place in January for the final time. In 2020, it switches to June to escape the cold weather and show off more products outside, including autonomous vehicles.Here are the big unveils coming up for the show, which opens to the public from Jan. 19 through 27:CADILLACThe marketing folks at General Motors’ Cadillac brand are hoping the new XT6 big SUV will carve out a niche in the crowded market for utilities with three rows of seats but aren’t so huge they’re considered trucks. The six- to seven-passenger XT6 has a chiseled Caddy look and unique premium luxury materials to set it apart, but it’s going against well-appointed luxury versions of the Chevrolet Traverse, GMC Acadia and Buick Enclave, as well as entries from BMW, Audi and other automakers. It’s also got the same engine as the other brands, a 3.6-litre V6 that puts out 310 horsepower, and a nine-speed automatic transmission. The XT6 has a suite of standard safety features including automatic emergency braking, blind spot detection and rear cross traffic alert. It goes on sale in the summer as a 2020 model in the U.S. Price and gas mileage weren’t announced.The Associated Presslast_img read more

Man injured in early morning shooting in Grande Prairie

first_imgGRANDE PRAIRIE, A.B. – Mounties in Grande Prairie were called out to a shooting early Tuesday morning at Evergreen Park.Upon arrival, police located a man inside a trailer suffering from a single gunshot wound.The 62-year-old man was transported to a local hospital where he remains in stable condition. Police believe this was not a random act and that there is no additional risk to public safety.The RCMP say they are continuing to investigate the incident.Anyone with information about the shooting is asked to call the Grande Prairie RCMP Detachment at 780-830-5700 or call your local police detachment. Should you wish to remain anonymous you can contact Crime Stoppers by phone at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS) or by internet at www.tipsubmit.com.last_img

The future development of the TseKwa caves in Charlie Lake

first_imgRezoning Report; CLICK HERETreaty 8; CLICK HERESimon Fraser University Research; CLICK HERENorthwest Coast Archeology; CLICK HERE FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – A rezoning application has been submitted to the Peace River Regional District to restore and protect the previously known Charlie Lake Caves, now Tse’K’wa land, by establishing an Indigenous cultural museum.Gary Oker, President of Tse’K’wa Heritage Society, shares the Tse’K’wa holds deep historical and cultural importance. The goal is to recreate the space to what it would have looked like in the stone age, to include an amphitheatre space as well as buildings to display the vast collection in 1000 piece range of found artifacts from the site.Oker says it would become a space for ceremonies, drumming and different things could be shared such as food, traditional song and stories for people to come and enjoy the history. It is important to Oker to increase the visibility of the indigenous people in the area. March 18th, 2019 there will be an open house at the Charlie Lake Community Hall. As the proper steps are being taken to rezone the land, Oker wants an opportunity to share with the Community what the vision for the land will be.The Simon Fraser University recognized Tse’K’wa as a significant space because of the historical content that was found and unearthed as it was being studied by the University.Oker said this will be a place that provides an opportunity for school children to come and learn as well as being a point of interest for tourism and visitors to the area and passing along the Alaska Hwy.To date, the biggest challenge Oker says they face is the defacing of the caves and he hopes that with the development of the site the cultural importance will be recognized so everyone can enjoy the land.Also represented is Diane Bigfoot, Director from Prophet River and Laura Webb, Director from West Moberly.For more information on the caves and report follow the links below.last_img read more

6 arrested for online fraud

first_imgNEW DELHI: Crime Branch of Delhi Police busted a gang involved in online cheating under the guise of technical support for various companies and application such as Google and Paypal. Six persons identified as Mohit Bansal, Udit, Yashwant Singh , Guraman Singh, Rohit Chauhan and Pfokreni Kayio involved in the racket have been arrested. Huge quantity of information technology equipment including several servers, routers, SIM Box, hard disks, SIM Cards used for cheating the gullible persons have been recovered from their possessions. Cash Rs 7.40 lakh has also been recovered from these gang members. Also Read – Bangla Sahib Gurudwara bans use of all types of plastic itemsInputs were received that a racket involving several persons based in India and abroad are involved in cheating the gullible persons on the pretext of providing technical assistance to the customer base of Google, Iphone, Paypal, Facebook etc. These fraudsters were making as well as receiving international calls by passing the legal long distance internation call gateways, thus thereby causing a huge loss to the Government Exchequer. During interrogation, it was revealed that these fraudsters had been working with a unique modus operandi by registering on Google Search Engine paid services license for helping customers in troubleshooting.last_img read more

JU fails to resolve admission debacle English Comparative Lit depts adamant on

first_imgKolkata: The Executive Council (EC) at Jadavpur University (JU) on Monday failed to resolve the long-standing admission debacle, with the English and Comparative Literature departments still sticking to their stand of admitting students in undergraduate level only on the basis of marks scored in entrance test. The EC, which is the highest decision-making body of the varsity, reverted the matter back to the admission committee, asking for reconsideration. The other Humanities departments, namely Bengali, International Relations, Philosophy and History, are in favour of the equal weightage system of admission, where 50 percent weightage will be given to marks obtained in the admission test, with the other 50 percent to marks scored in higher secondary or equivalent examination. The two-member admission committee formed by the varsity had recommended admission following the equal weightage system. It may be mentioned that in 2018, there were allegations of improper evaluation of answer scripts of History and the varsity had to conduct re-evaluation with external academicians. It was found that there was a significant variation of marks secured by the candidates in the first and second evaluation. The first evaluation was conducted by professors of the varsity’s History department while the second one was done by external experts. As a result, there were multiple changes in the revised selection list for History. A total number of 15 candidates, who were on the waiting list after the earlier evaluation, made it to the selection list after re-evaluation. A total of 344 scripts were re-evaluated. The merit list for admission was prepared on the basis of 50 percent of marks in the board examination and 50 percent of the marks scored in the admission test.last_img read more

CBI confirms probe in Bofors case will continue

first_imgNew Delhi: The CBI probe into the Bofors case pertaining to the alleged Rs 64 crore kickbacks in the purchase of the Swedish artillery guns will continue, officials said Thursday.”In view of certain revelations made by one Michael Hershman, CBI sought the permission of the trial court to conduct further investigation in the Bofors case,” CBI spokesperson Nitin Wakankar said. He said on May 8, 2019, the court had observed that when independent right and power is available with the CBI to further investigate the matter on their own, if in their wisdom it is necessary to do so then, why still such application is being filed in the court. Also Read – India gets first tranche of Swiss account details under automatic exchange framework”After obtaining legal opinion, CBI filed an application on May 16, 2019 in the court of CMM, Rouse Avenue Courts, New Delhi, stating that for conducting further investigation under section 173(8) of CrPC, permission of the court is not mandatorily required by CBI and an intimation to the court in this regard will suffice,” he said. He said the probe in the Bofors case will continue. The agency’s response came after it withdrew from a Delhi court its application to seek permission to further probe the politically sensitive Rs 64-crore Bofors payoff case. See P6last_img read more

US State Department hails Moroccos comprehensive counterterrorism strategy

Washington – The US Department of State welcomed on Wednesday Morocco’s comprehensive counterterrorism strategy, noting that the country’s efforts have effectively mitigated the risk of terrorism threat. Morocco has a comprehensive counterterrorism strategy that includes vigilant security measures, regional and international cooperation, and counter-radicalization policies,” said the US State Department’s annual Country Report on Terrorism 2013, published in Washington.The same report added that the North African country targeted and effectively dismantled terrorist cells within the country by leveraging intelligence collection, police work, and collaboration with regional and international partners. The document also hailed Morocco’s efforts to fight religious extremism, adding that the Kingdom developed a national strategy to confirm and further institutionalize the country’s widespread adherence to the moderate values Maliki school.The report also highlighted the efforts of King Mohammed VI to fight extremism, recalling the Ramadan series of religious lectures, hosted by the King, and which invite Muslim speakers from around the world to promote peaceful interpretations of Islam. read more