FRISCO Texas – Jason Witten mostly held it togeth

first_img FRISCO, Texas – Jason Witten mostly held it together while announcing he was retiring after 15 years with the Dallas Cowboys to go into TV.One wavering moment came when the tight end turned to owner Jerry Jones on a stage in front of his family, teammates and club employees in what normally serves as the dining room in the team’s practice facility.“The hardest part of this decision was knowing that I would never be able to hand you that Lombardi Trophy,” Witten said during his 15-minute speech Thursday. “I told you back in 2006 that I would not let you down. I hope that in your eyes, I held up my end of the bargain.”Just days away from turning 36, Witten is leaving to be the analyst for ESPN’s “Monday Night Football” telecast, a move the network confirmed after Witten’s retirement announcement.The decision by the franchise leader in games, catches and yards receiving is the same one friend and longtime teammate Tony Romo, the club passing leader in yards and touchdowns, made last year with CBS.They joined the Cowboys together in 2003 — Witten a third-round pick out of Tennessee and Romo the undrafted quarterback three years from becoming the starter. They left without getting Dallas to an NFC championship game, and the Super Bowl drought for a franchise with five titles is at 23 years and counting.“Jason has given so much to this team, to this franchise. He emptied the bucket here,” Jones said, responding to a question about that missing Super Bowl after speeches by all three on stage: Witten, Jones and coach Jason Garrett.“When I look at where we were with the great legacy of our fans that have had 56 years of being around some of the greatest people and names of players ever … to me, no one has ever given more of himself and no one has ever made any bigger impact.”The circumstances for Witten and Romo were different. The Cowboys were anticipating a 16th season, which would have been a club record, from their 11-time Pro Bowl player. Romo had lost his job to Dak Prescott while injured and was deciding last off-season whether to play elsewhere.As recently as two weeks ago, Witten suggested he might play until he was 40 and said he “absolutely” was returning. He acknowledged the offer from ESPN changed things.“In those moments, those other things didn’t exist,” said Witten, set to call the Cowboys’ home game against Tennessee on Nov. 5. “I was certain when I went through it that I wanted the blessing of Jerry and his family, an opportunity I have to stay around the game.”Dozens lined Witten’s walk from the entrance to the team’s headquarters, down some stairs and a long hallway to the dining room.His retirement ceremony, with Prescott and star running back Ezekiel Elliott watching from the same row, came not far from a huge picture of Witten’s signature moment — a 2007 game when he ran nearly 30 yards and was tackled without a helmet after it was knocked off.The Cowboys hung that picture over the entrance to their indoor practice field long before Witten pondered retirement. He spent two seasons walking under it.“Whenever young kids come up to me and ask me, ‘How do you grow up and play for the Dallas Cowboys, and have that type of career?’” Witten said. “My answer was always the same, the secret is in the dirt. I was never the most talented, never the flashiest, I relied on grit.”Witten was also known for durability, holding club records for consecutive games (235) and starts (179). He missed one game, the fifth of his rookie season because of a broken jaw, and returned 23 days after rupturing his spleen in a preseason game to play the 2012 opener.With 1,152 catches for 12,448 yards, Witten joins Tony Gonzalez as the only NFL tight ends with at least 1,000 catches and 10,000 yards. His 15 seasons are tied for the most in Dallas with defensive end Ed “Too Tall” Jones, safety Bill Bates and late offensive lineman Mark Tuinei.“He’s one of the best and most complete tight ends ever to play this game,” Garrett said. “The stats and the credentials speak for themselves. They don’t really begin to tell the story. Over the last 15 years, he’s played virtually every play.”Witten is third on the Cowboys’ list with 68 touchdown catches. He trails Dez Bryant, released last month with 73 TDs, and Hall of Famer Bob Hayes (71).Without Witten and Bryant, the Cowboys are missing their top two receivers from last year and essentially for the past six seasons. Among the tight ends left behind, only one has a catch in a regular-season game: Geoff Swaim with nine over three seasons.The Cowboys are high on Blake Jarwin and hope that former Baylor basketball player Rico Gathers can develop after missing his entire second season with a concussion. Dallas drafted Stanford’s Dalton Schultz in the fourth round last week.“There’s an old saying in pro football, the circus doesn’t stay in town forever,” Witten said. “And when you’re young, I think it takes on a meaning that when your opportunity comes, grab it. I’ve decided that the time has come for me to pass the torch to the next generation of Dallas Cowboys.”___More AP NFL: http://www.pro32.ap.org and http://www.twitter.com/AP_NFL Cowboys’ Jason Witten retiring sans Super Bowl for TV job Dallas Cowboys tight end Jason Witten, center, walks in with his family to the team’s NFL football training facility and headquarters before announcing his retirement in a news conference, Thursday, May 3, 2018, in Frisco, Texas (AP Photo/Richard Rodriguez) center_img by Schuyler Dixon, The Associated Press Posted May 3, 2018 8:22 am PDT Last Updated May 3, 2018 at 6:20 pm PDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Emaillast_img read more

Ethan Hawke explores faith and the environment in

first_imgEthan Hawke explores faith and the environment in ‘First Reformed’ by Victoria Ahearn, The Canadian Press Posted May 31, 2018 11:30 am PDT Last Updated May 31, 2018 at 12:00 pm PDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email TORONTO – Ethan Hawke grew up in a church-going family.His mother taught Sunday school, his father “is extremely devout,” his stepfather “is even more devout,” and his great-grandmother wanted him to be a priest, says the four-time Oscar-nominated actor and scribe.“The wonderful thing about my exposure to the religious community was that my mother and father had very different opinions about things and it created not one rigid attitude in my brain,” Hawke said in a recent phone interview.“As a young person, I couldn’t betray my mother and I couldn’t betray my father, and so I had to have a very supple and limber relationship to faith and became kind of allergic to dogma and zealotry.”Such subject matter is explored in Hawke’s widely acclaimed new film, “First Reformed,” which hits theatres in Canada on Friday.Written and directed by Paul Schrader, the dark drama stars Hawke as a minister going through a crisis of faith after his son dies. His beliefs are further tested when he tries to help a pregnant parishioner (Amanda Seyfried) and her radical environmentalist husband (Philip Ettinger).The dark story explores issues facing religion and the environment — two things that have helped inform Hawke’s current outlook on life.“I would consider myself a transcendentalist, if I had to put a label on it,” said Hawke, who lives in New York but spends his summers at a place he has near Guysborough, N.S.“I really love (Ralph Waldo) Emerson and (Henry David) Thoreau and these people who are rooted in the Christian orientation that is seen through the prism of being a part of nature. That’s been my great love and joy,” Hawke continued.“It’s one of the things I love about going to Nova Scotia — the land is so much a part of your day and the weather is so much a part of your day.”Upstate New York is the setting for “First Reformed,” which looks at the influences a capitalist society has on the church, politics and environment.The story highlights a systemic problem and how “society sometimes makes it harder for us to live up to our best selves,” Hawke said.“When people have a lot of money, they can really make a lot of noise,” he explained. “I went to the Standing Rock march, for example, and one of the problems is they don’t have a lot of money.“If you made a movie about Standing Rock…. Nobody would be crying salty tears for the giant mega gas company that’s drilling underneath their water. But yet we let it happen. We let it happen because it’s easy to let it happen, and it’s hard to do something about it because of the money.”Hawke said he was drawn to the genuine portrayal of a religious figure in a film world where such characters are often “made fun of or evil.”He portrayed the role in an acting manner he’s been employing since his 1995 film “Before Sunrise”: by not acting.“I guess it’s kind of a philosophy about blurring the line between character and performer to such an extent that there is no line, that there is no ‘performance,’ that you’re inhabiting and living in an imaginary space but that while you’re there you’re really doing it,” Hawke said.“One of the first acting jobs that I ever had was ‘White Fang’ where I had to act with this wolf, and it’s kind of the greatest teacher that I ever had, because the wolf doesn’t act. The wolf just deals with the circumstances that are in front of it, and if you start acting with the wolf, the wolf gets totally freaked out and wonders why you’re so weird.“So when parts are well written, you can disappear into them.”center_img Actor Ethan Hawke is shown in a scene from the film “First Reformed.” THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-ABMO Films MANDATORY CREDIT last_img read more