USbased publisher Chicken Soup for the Soul has c

first_imgUS-based publisher Chicken Soup for the Soul has created a TV and film division and brought in former A+E boss Steve Ronson to run it.Chicken Soup for the Soul is known for its books featuring inspirational true-life stories and will make branded TV shows and features.Ronson left A+E late last year after a 13-year stint at the channel operator, latterly as VP, international television, digital media and consumer products.In his new role as CEO of Chicken Soup for the Soul Productions, he will oversee the new unit’s content efforts and its existing TV projects, which include the recently released special Chicken Soup for the Soul: food & family. The teen-skewed education/information show that went out on PBS. The new division will make a talk show, feature film and other TV projects.“Chicken Soup for the Soul is a well-known brand that translates into highly entertaining, inspirational television,” said Ronson, CEO, Chicken Soup for the Soul Productions. “The brand is unique, beloved worldwide, and delivers the important, uplifting and inspiring messages of our time.”“We already have several ambitious television and theatrical projects underway,” said Chicken Soup for the Soul founder and CEO, William Rouhana, Jr. “With an eye toward building upon these opportunities, we are pleased to announce the formation of Chicken Soup for the Soul Productions, headed by industry veteran Steve Ronson.”last_img read more

Scientists explore new treatment targets for retinal damage

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Jan 31 2019Scientists at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University are looking at new treatment targets for the retinal damage that often accompanies diseases like diabetes, glaucoma and hypertension.Characterized by damage to the blood vessels, those diseases often lead to ischemia – or a disruption of the blood supply to an organ or part of the body. In the case of the retina, that disruption can lead to vision loss.”The neurons in the retina help us see by transmitting signals from the optic nerve to the brain. The blood vessels in the retina supply those neurons with the blood they need and when there is ischemia, the neurons start to die. We want to find new ways to treat that damage,” says Dr. Abdelrahman Y. Fouda, an MCG postdoctoral fellow.With a two-year postdoctoral fellowship award from the American Heart Association, Fouda is working with Dr. Ruth B. Caldwell, cell biologist in MCG’s Vascular Biology Center, to help find those new treatment targets.They believe the key lies in the enzyme arginase 1, which is present in the liver and helps it turn ammonia into urea and eventually clear it from the body. But, in retinal damage, they believe that the enzyme helps suppress the excessive inflammation caused by big white blood cells called macrophages.When an injury occurs in the body, the immune system sends these macrophages to clean up the damage. These versatile cells, whose name literally means “big eater” in Greek, engulf and digest substances the body deems unhealthy. They also play a big role in regulating inflammation, which is necessary to repair damage, but can be damaging itself in excess.Related StoriesNew therapy shows promise in preventing brain damage after traumatic brain injuryLiving-donor liver transplant offers advantages over deceased-donor, research findsNeural pathways explain the relationship between imagination and willingness to helpThere are two types of these big eaters – M1s that promote inflammation and M2s that are known more for their reparative qualities. And M2s make arginase 1, leading Fouda and Caldwell to suspect the enzyme played a role in the intensity of the immune response in these ischemic injuries.”Basically when we remove arginase 1, the macrophages are more inflammatory, more damaging, and when we add it back, they are less inflammatory, more reparative,” Fouda says.They are studying a disease model called ischemia reperfusion injury, in which blood flow is removed then restored, inducing destructive inflammation, oxidative stress and resulting damage to neurons and blood vessels. Scientists looked at normal mice as well as those with arginase 1 knocked out body-wide, specifically from macrophages or from the endothelial cells that line blood vessels.In normal mice and mice without arginase 1 in the endothelial cells, the macrophages that raced to the injury site promoted an inflammatory response. In the mice without the enzyme in their macrophages, the retinal damage was worse, seemingly proving the enzyme plays a key role in regulating the immune response and resulting damage.Next steps include delineating just how that happens.They are also studying a more stable form of arginase 1, called pegylated arginase 1, which when administered also reduced inflammation and retinal damage. That form of the enzyme is already in early clinical trials for advanced liver cancer.There are currently no effective therapies for the neurovascular injury.Source: http://www.augusta.edu/mcg/last_img read more

Gastrointestinal symptoms in children could be a red flag for future mental

first_imgReviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Mar 29 2019A Columbia University study has found that adversity early in life is associated with increased gastrointestinal symptoms in children that may have an impact on the brain and behavior as they grow to maturity.The study was published online March 28 in the journal Development and Psychopathology.”One common reason children show up at doctors’ offices is intestinal complaints,” said Nim Tottenham, a professor of psychology at Columbia and senior author on the study. “Our findings indicate that gastrointestinal symptoms in young children could be a red flag to primary care physicians for future emotional health problems.”Scientists have long noted the strong connection between the gut and brain. Previous research has demonstrated that a history of trauma or abuse has been reported in up to half of adults with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), at a prevalence twice that of patients without IBS.”The role of trauma in increasing vulnerability to both gastrointestinal and mental health symptoms is well established in adults but rarely studied in childhood,” said study lead author Bridget Callaghan, a post-doctoral research fellow in Columbia’s psychology department. In addition, she said, animal studies have demonstrated that adversity-induced changes in the gut microbiome – the community of bacteria in the body that regulates everything from digestion to immune system function-influence neurological development, but no human studies have done so.”Our study is among the first to link disruption of a child’s gastrointestinal microbiome triggered by early-life adversity with brain activity in regions associated with emotional health,” Callaghan said.The researchers focused on development in children who experienced extreme psychosocial deprivation due to institutional care before international adoption. Separation of a child from a parent is known to be a powerful predictor of mental health issues in humans. That experience, when modeled in rodents, induces fear and anxiety, hinders neurodevelopment and alters microbial communities across the lifespan.The researchers drew upon data from 115 children adopted from orphanages or foster care on or before approximately they were 2 years old, and from 229 children raised by a biological caregiver. The children with past caregiving disruptions showed higher levels of symptoms that included stomach aches, constipation, vomiting and nausea.Related StoriesHospitals’ decision to transfer kids with mental health emergencies is based on insurance typeRevolutionary gene replacement surgery restores vision in patients with retinal degenerationEffective stop smoking treatments less likely to be prescribed to people with mental health conditionsFrom that sample of adoptees, the researchers then selected eight participants, ages 7 to 13, from the adversity exposed group and another eight who’d been in the group raised by their biological parents. Tottenham and Callaghan collected behavioral information, stool samples and brain images from all the children. They used gene sequencing to identify the microbes present in the stool samples and examined the abundance and diversity of bacteria in each participant’s fecal matter.The children with a history of early caregiving disruptions had distinctly different gut microbiomes from those raised with biological caregivers from birth. Brain scans of all the children also showed that brain activity patterns were correlated with certain bacteria. For example, the children raised by parents had increased gut microbiome diversity, which is linked to the prefrontal cortex, a region of the brain known to help regulate emotions.”It is too early to say anything conclusive, but our study indicates that adversity-associated changes in the gut microbiome are related to brain function, including differences in the regions of the brain associated with emotional processing,” says Tottenham, an expert in emotional development.More research is needed, but Tottenham and Callaghan believe their study helps to fill in an important gap in the literature.”Animal studies tell us that dietary interventions and probiotics can manipulate the gut microbiome and ameliorate the effects of adversity on the central nervous system, especially during the first years of life when the developing brain and microbiome are more plastic,” Callaghan says. “It is possible that this type of research will help us to know if and how to best intervene in humans, and when.”Callaghan and Tottenham are currently working on a larger-scale study with 60 children in New York City to see if their findings can be replicated. They expect the results later this year. Source:https://www.columbia.edu/last_img read more

Teen drivers with ADHD more likely to crash and get traffic violations

first_imgWe need additional research to understand the specific mechanisms by which ADHD symptoms influence crash risk so that we can develop skills training and behavioral interventions to reduce the risk for newly licensed drivers with ADHD. There’s not enough research currently being conducted on older adolescents and young adults with ADHD, particularly studies focused on promoting safe driving behavior.”Thomas J. Power, PhD, ABPP, study co-author and director of the Center for Management of ADHD at CHOP Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)May 21 2019Teen drivers diagnosed with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are significantly more likely to crash, be issued traffic and moving violations, and engage in risky driving behaviors than their peers without ADHD, according to a Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) study published today in the journal Pediatrics.The multidisciplinary team of researchers from CHOP’s Center for Injury Research and Prevention and Center for Management of ADHD analyzed detailed crash and traffic violation records for newly licensed drivers to conduct the first large-scale longitudinal study on this topic.By highlighting the specific types of crashes and traffic violations, this study identifies risky driving behaviors that those with ADHD may be more likely to engage in, such as driving while intoxicated, not wearing a seat belt, and speeding. Because these behaviors are amenable to change, these findings suggest that clinicians and families can work with this at-risk group of teens to practice safe driving behaviors and potentially reduce their crash risk. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), an estimated 6.1 million children ages 2 to 17 living in the United States have been diagnosed with ADHD. Many of these youth with ADHD are potential drivers, and safe transportation is a growing concern. Evidence-based guidance to clinicians and families is urgently needed to protect these drivers, as well as others on the road.For the retrospective study, researchers reviewed the records of 14,936 adolescents who were patients at six CHOP primary care practices in New Jersey and had obtained an intermediate driver’s license between January 2004 and December 2014. The study team linked the adolescents’ electronic health data with New Jersey driver licensing records, traffic violations, and police-reported crash data. Within this group, the researchers identified 1,769 adolescents with childhood-diagnosed ADHD who obtained an intermediate driver’s license during the study period, and compared their crash outcomes with those of the drivers without ADHD.Related StoriesResearchers identify gene mutations linked to leukemia in children with Down’s syndromeNew network for children and youth with special health care needs seeks to improve systems of care’Traffic light’ food labels associated with reduction in calories purchased by hospital employeesAlthough crash risk is elevated for all newly licensed drivers, the study team found it is 62 percent higher for those with ADHD the first month after getting licensed, and 37 percent higher during the first four years after licensure, regardless of their age when licensed. Drivers with ADHD also experienced higher rates of specific crash types, including driving with passengers, at-fault-, single vehicle-, injury- and alcohol-related crashes, the last risk being 109 percent higher than those without ADHD.The rates of traffic and moving violations were also significantly higher among young drivers with ADHD as compared to those without ADHD. Among these drivers, nearly 37 percent were issued a traffic violation and nearly 27 percent a moving violation within their first year of driving, compared to 25 percent and 18 percent respectively among their peers without ADHD. Drivers with ADHD had higher rates of alcohol or drug violations and moving violations (including speeding, nonuse of seat belts, and electronic equipment use). Their rate was 3.5 times that of young drivers without ADHD in the first year of driving and 1.5 times that of young drivers without ADHD in the first four years of driving. Source:Children’s Hospital of PhiladelphiaJournal reference:Curry, A.E. et al. (2019) Traffic Crashes, Violations, and Suspensions Among Young Drivers With ADHD. Pediatrics. doi.org/10.1542/peds.2018-2305. What this study suggests is that we have to go beyond current recommendations of medication and delaying the age of getting licensed to decrease crash risk for teens with ADHD. Their higher rate of citations suggest that risky driving behaviors may account for why they crash more. More research is needed to objectively measure if and how these behaviors specifically contribute to crash risk.”Allison E. Curry, PhD, MPH, lead author of the study and a Senior Scientist and Director of Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the Center for Injury Research and Prevention at CHOPlast_img read more

3M reward offered in case where US device was used in IEDs

first_imgFederal authorities are offering a $3 million reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of a man wanted for illegally obtaining U.S. technology that was later used in improvised explosive devices in Iraq. Authorities say 55-year-old Hossein Ahmad Larijani is believed to be in Tehran, Iran.He was indicted in 2010 on charges related to exporting radio transceiver modules made by a Minnesota company, which has not been publicly identified.Authorities say Larijani orchestrated a scheme in which 6,000 modules were shipped to Singapore, under the guise that they’d be used in a telecommunications project. Instead, the devices were then shipped to Iran and used in IEDs that targeted U.S. and coalition forces in Iraq from 2008 to 2010.Three of Larijani’s co-defendants from Singapore have pleaded guilty. A fourth remains at large in Singapore. © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: $3M reward offered in case where US device was used in IEDs (2018, November 20) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-11-3m-reward-case-device-ieds.html Explore further US trial convicts trio of high-tech exports to Russialast_img read more

US32m swiped from cryptocurrency exchange in latest hack

first_imgTOKYO: Japanese cryptocurrency exchange Bitpoint suspended all services after losing about 3.5 billion yen ($32 million) in a hack that involved Ripple and other cryptocurrencies. Tags / Keywords: The exchange, which is owned by Remixpoint Inc., said about 2.5 billion yen of stolen funds belonged to customers, while Bitpoint owned the rest. Remixpoint shares plunged 19% to their daily lower limit, and were untraded in Tokyo as of 1:44 p.m. on a glut of sell orders.The funds were stolen from a hot wallet that contained five cryptocurrencies including Bitcoin and Bitcoin Cash. It said it hasn’t discovered any funds missing from cold wallets.The exchange was among cryptocurrency operators ordered by Japan’s Financial Services Agency to improve internal controls following the 2018 hack of Coincheck. – Bloomberg {{category}} {{time}} {{title}} Related News Cryptocurrencycenter_img Cryptocurrency 11 Jul 2019 Bitcoin extends losses after Fed chief urges halt to Facebook’s crypto project Nation 09 Jul 2019 Zooming in on cryptocurrency Cryptocurrency 2d ago Bitcoin extends loss after Fed urges halt to Facebook crypto project Related Newslast_img read more

Britain sends second warship to gulf amid tensions with Iran Sky

first_img Related News World 11 Jul 2019 Iran’s Revolutionary Guards deny trying to stop British tanker in Gulf – Fars news World 11 Jul 2019 Britain says three Iranian boats tried to block its ship in Gulf World 1d ago Gibraltar says it took decision to detain Iranian tanker Related News LONDON (Reuters) – Britain is sending a second warship to the Gulf amid growing tensions with Iran after Royal Marines seized an Iranian tanker off the coast of Gibraltar last week, Sky News reported. AdChoices广告Sky said the destroyer HMS Duncan, which had been earmarked for deployment in the region anyway although not so soon, would sail to the Gulf in the next few days to join the frigate HMS Montrose. Britain’s Ministry of Defence had no immediate comment on the report. (Reporting by Michael Holden; editing by Stephen Addison) {{category}} {{time}} {{title}}last_img read more